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Posts Tagged: Jerry Powell

'A Night at the Bohart Museum' to Celebrate Moths and Other Insects

What are the main differences between moths and butterflies? That's a question frequently asked at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, especially...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, the curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, displays a drawer of tropical butterfly specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, the curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, displays a drawer of tropical butterfly specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, the curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, displays a drawer of tropical butterfly specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A white-lined sphinx moth, Hyles lineata, heads for salvia in a UC Davis garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A white-lined sphinx moth, Hyles lineata, heads for salvia in a UC Davis garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A white-lined sphinx moth, Hyles lineata, heads for salvia in a UC Davis garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 19, 2023 at 3:03 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Bohart Museum to Dedicate Open House to Jerry Powell

When the Bohart Museum of Entomology of UC Davis hosts a “Night at the Museum” (formerly known as “Moth Night”) it will be...

In this 2017 archived photo, Jerry Powell (seated at microscope) talks to colleagues at a Lepidopterist Society meeting at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. From left are entomologist Max Klepikov of Berkeley; UC Davis distinguished professor Don Strong of the  Department of Evolution and Ecology; and Eric Lopresti, then a UC Davis graduate student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In this 2017 archived photo, Jerry Powell (seated at microscope) talks to colleagues at a Lepidopterist Society meeting at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. From left are entomologist Max Klepikov of Berkeley; UC Davis distinguished professor Don Strong of the Department of Evolution and Ecology; and Eric Lopresti, then a UC Davis graduate student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In this 2017 archived photo, Jerry Powell (seated at microscope) talks to colleagues at a Lepidopterist Society meeting at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. From left are entomologist Max Klepikov of Berkeley; UC Davis distinguished professor Don Strong of the Department of Evolution and Ecology; and Eric Lopresti, then a UC Davis graduate student. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with Jerry Powell, a longtime director of the Essig Museum of Entomology. This image was taken Feb. 9, 2013 at a Lepidopterist Society gathering at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with Jerry Powell, a longtime director of the Essig Museum of Entomology. This image was taken Feb. 9, 2013 at a Lepidopterist Society gathering at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with Jerry Powell, a longtime director of the Essig Museum of Entomology. This image was taken Feb. 9, 2013 at a Lepidopterist Society gathering at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 12, 2023 at 7:01 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Take a Bug Break--and Bring Along This Book

Don't take a coffee break. Take a bug break. Step into your garden, walk over to a community park, or hike in the wilderness and see what's out...

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Booklice, Liposcelis bostrychophila, are nearly microscopic (about a millimeter long). You may find them in your cornmeal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Booklice, Liposcelis bostrychophila, are nearly microscopic (about a millimeter long). You may find them in your cornmeal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Booklice, Liposcelis bostrychophila, are nearly microscopic (about a millimeter long). You may find them in your cornmeal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, perches on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina (formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina (formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina (formerly known as Xylocopa varipuncta). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 22, 2020 at 4:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Ever Seen a Plume Moth?

Have you ever seen a plume moth? Or has a plume moth ever seen you? We spotted a pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) yesterday on our...

A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pterophorid plume moth (family Pterophoridae) in Vacaville, Calif. on April 2, 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 3, 2020 at 3:07 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Assassins in The Garden

A pollinator garden is a study in diversity--and of inclusion and exclusion. The residents, the immigrants, the fly-bys, the crawlers, the wigglers,...

Lying in Wait--An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lying in Wait--An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lying in Wait--An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, lies in wait on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, sucking the juices from prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, sucking the juices from prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, sucking the juices from prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Caught in the act!  An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, stabbing a lady beetle, aka lady bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Caught in the act! An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, stabbing a lady beetle, aka lady bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Caught in the act! An assassin bug, Zelus renardii, stabbing a lady beetle, aka lady bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Who's next? The assassin bug, Zelus renardii, appears to be looking at the camera after killing a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Who's next? The assassin bug, Zelus renardii, appears to be looking at the camera after killing a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Who's next? The assassin bug, Zelus renardii, appears to be looking at the camera after killing a lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 12, 2019 at 6:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

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