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Posts Tagged: milkweed

Flight of the Lady Beetle

Have you ever seen a lady beetle, aka ladybird beetle, aka ladybug, take flight? Have you ever photographed it? It's early...

A lady beetle prepares for take-off in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle prepares for take-off in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle prepares for take-off in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle unfolds its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The lady beetle unfolds its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle unfolds its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And the lady beetle takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And the lady beetle takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And the lady beetle takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 22, 2022 at 2:28 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Ever See a Leafcutter Bee Sunning Itself on a Milkweed Leaf?

Well, that's something you don't see every day: a leafcutter bee sunning itself on a milkweed leaf. The narrowleafed milkweed, Asclepias...

A  leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., rests on a leaf of milkweed, Asclepias fascicularis, in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. Both are natives. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., rests on a leaf of milkweed, Asclepias fascicularis, in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. Both are natives. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., rests on a leaf of milkweed, Asclepias fascicularis, in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. Both are natives. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leaf is long and the leafcutter bee is short. Leafcutter bees are smaller than honey bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The leaf is long and the leafcutter bee is short. Leafcutter bees are smaller than honey bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leaf is long and the leafcutter bee is short. Leafcutter bees are smaller than honey bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the male leafcutter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the male leafcutter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the male leafcutter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 5, 2022 at 3:57 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Walda: a Master of Disguise, Stealth and Ambush

Where's Waldo?  If you've ever looked at a “Where's Waldo” pictorial book and tried to spot a cartoon-like character wearing a...

A praying mantis is camouflaged amid the green stems, seed pods and leaves of a native milkweed as she awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis is camouflaged amid the green stems, seed pods and leaves of a native milkweed as she awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis is camouflaged amid the green stems, seed pods and leaves of a native milkweed as she awaits prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, no prey in sight, so I guess I'll just wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Well, no prey in sight, so I guess I'll just wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, no prey in sight, so I guess I'll just wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While I wait, I may as well groom myself. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
While I wait, I may as well groom myself. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While I wait, I may as well groom myself. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I see you! You don't look like prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I see you! You don't look like prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I see you! You don't look like prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 1, 2022 at 8:10 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Overwintering Milkweed Bugs on the Prowl

Have you seen any overwintering milkweed bugs lately? About a dozen milkweed bugs, Oncopeltus fasciatus, emerged from seclusion Jan....

Two's company, three's a crowd? Milkweed bugs on a cactus on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two's company, three's a crowd? Milkweed bugs on a cactus on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two's company, three's a crowd? Milkweed bugs on a cactus on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A colorful milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, sunning itself on a succulent on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A colorful milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, sunning itself on a succulent on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A colorful milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, sunning itself on a succulent on Jan. 2, 2022 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Warmth of the January sun and these milkweed bugs are getting all of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Warmth of the January sun and these milkweed bugs are getting all of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Warmth of the January sun and these milkweed bugs are getting all of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 10, 2022 at 3:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

What's Happening with Our Western Monarchs?

"A count of the Western monarch butterfly population last winter saw a staggering drop in numbers, but there are hopeful signs the beautiful...

A monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in October, 2021 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in October, 2021 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch nectaring on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in October, 2021 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar feasting on tropical milkweed in Vacaville, Calif. in the summer of 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar feasting on tropical milkweed in Vacaville, Calif. in the summer of 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar feasting on tropical milkweed in Vacaville, Calif. in the summer of 2020. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 5, 2021 at 2:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

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