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So, You've Planted a Bee Garden--Now What? Enroll in This UC Davis Class

So, you've planted a bee garden, and you're looking at it and thinking "Okay, now what?" You'll want to register for a class on "I Planted a...

A praying mantis hanging out on a cleveland sage, Salvia clevelandii, at the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis hanging out on a cleveland sage, Salvia clevelandii, at the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis hanging out on a cleveland sage, Salvia clevelandii, at the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A six-foot-long honey bee sculpture, the work of Donna Billick (pictured) of Davis, anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A six-foot-long honey bee sculpture, the work of Donna Billick (pictured) of Davis, anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A six-foot-long honey bee sculpture, the work of Donna Billick (pictured) of Davis, anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 3:55 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Ginger Plant Intrigue

Several years ago, while visiting a dear friend and former work colleague in the Bay Area, I toured her plant-packed backyard admiring her husband's koi pond and her collection of tropical plants. A ginger plant caught my eye, and as every passionate gardener does, I returned home with a little plant standing atop its rhizome that she'd carefully separated from her thick healthy horizontal clump of long pointed variegated leaves.
 
Only later did I learn that the best thing I did at the time, considering my limited knowledge of ginger plants, was deciding to plant my ginger in a pot. I selected a deep tall ceramic container and filled it with a mix of garden soil and potting mix. Then I set the pot in a protected flower bed beside my house beneath an eave and added a drip line. What I also didn't know at the time is that ginger plants are adverse to waterlogged soil, so the pot not only provided well-drained soil but I was able to move and adjust the drip line as the rhizomes multiplied. Also, the pot reined in ginger's natural inclination to grow horizontally. Plus, its proximity to the house wall and an eave provided just enough shade on scorching summer afternoons to avoid burning the leaves. I guess you could say I was just lucky.
 
Alpinia zerumbet ‘Variegata' is the name of the intriguing ginger thriving to this day in my backyard. Some call this variety “shell ginger” for its strands of flowers that look like tiny seashells strung together. Each year when the weather warms, I stand in awe at the gorgeous fragrant display. Also labeled a “variegated ginger,” its leaves live up to that moniker, each leaf unique with an unpredictable pattern from stripes to splotches of green, white and yellow. The leaves alone are an attractive addition, especially to a fall or winter garden. Although the stalks can be susceptible to a frost or freeze, don't despair and toss out the “died back” clump. By spring you'll notice new shoots popping up once again. For me, it's all part of the intrigue.

photos by Launa Herrmann
photos by Launa Herrmann

Photo 2
Photo 2

Posted on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 at 12:46 PM

Olivia Winokur: Targeting the Yellow Fever Mosquito

If you've been following the statewide news on the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes ageypti, you'll want to hear a seminar by Olivia Winokur on...

Vector-borne disease specialist Olivia Winokur of UC Davis with her Dalmatian, Scotty.
Vector-borne disease specialist Olivia Winokur of UC Davis with her Dalmatian, Scotty.

Vector-borne disease specialist Olivia Winokur of UC Davis with her Dalmatian, Scotty.

Posted on Monday, October 3, 2022 at 3:31 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Preliminary Results from Targeted Rotational Grazing Study

This article is a follow-up to Testing Targeted Rotational Grazing for Ecological and Financial Benefits, which was published on this blog on July 7,...

Posted on Friday, September 30, 2022 at 3:49 PM

Learning About Wasps and Other Insects

They came to learn about wasps--"The Weird and Wonderful Wasps"--at the recent open house hosted by the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis...

Postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev, a Ukrainian entomologist who studies flies, discusses insects with guests. On the screen is a Jerusalem cricket, also known as a potato bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev, a Ukrainian entomologist who studies flies, discusses insects with guests. On the screen is a Jerusalem cricket, also known as a potato bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev, a Ukrainian entomologist who studies flies, discusses insects with guests. On the screen is a Jerusalem cricket, also known as a potato bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of an elaterid click beetle flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An image of an elaterid click beetle flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of an elaterid click beetle flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a underwing moth  flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An image of a underwing moth flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a underwing moth flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. In the foreground is Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a chrysidid cuckoo wasp,  Chrysis lindae, flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An image of a chrysidid cuckoo wasp, Chrysis lindae, flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a chrysidid cuckoo wasp, Chrysis lindae, flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a cockroach flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An image of a cockroach flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An image of a cockroach flashes on the screen as postdoctoral researcher Severyn Korneyev talks to visitors at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas shows insect specimens in the lepidoptera collection to Defan Peterson of Davis and her daughter, Dylan 6, and son, Ender, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas shows insect specimens in the lepidoptera collection to Defan Peterson of Davis and her daughter, Dylan 6, and son, Ender, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas shows insect specimens in the lepidoptera collection to Defan Peterson of Davis and her daughter, Dylan 6, and son, Ender, 4. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, lifts a drawer of specimens for visitors to see. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, lifts a drawer of specimens for visitors to see. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, lifts a drawer of specimens for visitors to see. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon answers a question from an open house visitor. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon answers a question from an open house visitor. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum senior museum scientist Steve Heydon answers a question from an open house visitor. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Brennen Dyer, a UC Davis alumnus and a Bohart Museum laboratory assistant, shows a visitor some of the displays at the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Brennen Dyer, a UC Davis alumnus and a Bohart Museum laboratory assistant, shows a visitor some of the displays at the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Brennen Dyer, a UC Davis alumnus and a Bohart Museum laboratory assistant, shows a visitor some of the displays at the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 30, 2022 at 2:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

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