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Bingo! First Cabbage White Butterfly of the Year!

In between the rain and the cold, UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro of the Department of Evolution and Ecology has been searching in vain...

UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro spotted two cabbage white butterflies today (Feb. 8) in West Sacramento, Yolo County. These weren't them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro spotted two cabbage white butterflies today (Feb. 8) in West Sacramento, Yolo County. These weren't them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro spotted two cabbage white butterflies today (Feb. 8) in West Sacramento, Yolo County. These weren't them. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the first-flight-of-the-butterfly chart by UC Davis alumnus Matthew
This is the first-flight-of-the-butterfly chart by UC Davis alumnus Matthew "Matt" Forister, the Trevor J. McMinn Endowed Professor in Biology, and Foundation Professor, Department of Biology, University of Nevada.

This is the first-flight-of-the-butterfly chart by UC Davis alumnus Matthew "Matt" Forister, the Trevor J. McMinn Endowed Professor in Biology, and Foundation Professor, Department of Biology, University of Nevada.

Posted on Wednesday, February 8, 2023 at 4:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Of Bugs and Plants and Eagles...and More...

Of bugs and plants and eagles...and more... The 12th annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day, set Saturday, Feb. 18 on the university campus, will...

The Bohart Museum of Entomology's live petting zoo draws scores of visitors. Here a youngster gets acquainted with a stick insect, aka walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Bohart Museum of Entomology's live petting zoo draws scores of visitors. Here a youngster gets acquainted with a stick insect, aka walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum of Entomology's live petting zoo draws scores of visitors. Here a youngster gets acquainted with a stick insect, aka walking stick. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Center for Plant Diversity, aka Herbarium, located in the Esau Science Hall, includes a petting zoo. Visitors can
The Center for Plant Diversity, aka Herbarium, located in the Esau Science Hall, includes a petting zoo. Visitors can "pet" pine cones. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Center for Plant Diversity, aka Herbarium, located in the Esau Science Hall, includes a petting zoo. Visitors can "pet" pine cones. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Raptor Center volunteer Billy Thein introduces the crowd to a golden eagle during a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Raptor Center volunteer Billy Thein introduces the crowd to a golden eagle during a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Raptor Center volunteer Billy Thein introduces the crowd to a golden eagle during a UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Know your plants! This group of young visitors at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden display gets acquainted with plants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Know your plants! This group of young visitors at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden display gets acquainted with plants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Know your plants! This group of young visitors at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden display gets acquainted with plants. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 7, 2023 at 3:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Water-Logged Miku

 

 

photo by Mike Gunther

 

Atmospheric Rivers
Cold rainy dreary days
Much water for spring plants

Posted on Tuesday, February 7, 2023 at 12:00 AM

The Monarchs at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

When visitors flock to the 11 museums or collections during the 12th annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day on Saturday, Feb. 18 and stop at...

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Bohart Museum's Lepidoptera collection, holds a drawer of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Bohart Museum's Lepidoptera collection, holds a drawer of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Bohart Museum's Lepidoptera collection, holds a drawer of monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Michael Silva (back at right), a biotechnology professor at Solano Community College and a member of the Vacaville City Council, recently visited the Bohart with his sons Jovanni, 12, and Benjamin, 6. With them are Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and Lepidoptera collection curator Jeff Smith. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Michael Silva (back at right), a biotechnology professor at Solano Community College and a member of the Vacaville City Council, recently visited the Bohart with his sons Jovanni, 12, and Benjamin, 6. With them are Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and Lepidoptera collection curator Jeff Smith. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Michael Silva (back at right), a biotechnology professor at Solano Community College and a member of the Vacaville City Council, recently visited the Bohart with his sons Jovanni, 12, and Benjamin, 6. With them are Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum and Lepidoptera collection curator Jeff Smith. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 6, 2023 at 3:36 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

A Bright Spring

I have noticed over the past few weeks, the leaves of daffodils (Narcissus spp.) poking up through the soil. A sure sign that spring is upon us. Just this morning, the flowers of a few daffodils are peeking out their yellow brilliance, but not fully blooming quite yet. I love daffodils and other flowers in the Amaryllis family. They are always cheerful, and bright.

photos by Jennifer Baumbach

Recently, I had the good luck of joining the American Daffodil Society. I received a special invitation from The American Horticulture Society since I am currently a member of the latter. Several enticements encouraged me to join: a daffodil bulb starter kit, a year subscription to The Daffodil JournalA Pocket Guide to Daffodils and The Daffodil Primer, and finally, the ability to network with other daffodil lovers.

Two weeks after I joined, I received a package from my new daffodil friend back east, SaraKinne. She had enclosed a sweet, hand-drawn daffodil card and the three publications listed above, and four handouts. Inside the package were the daffodils as well. 

The varieties were ‘Sweet Orange,' ‘Trevithian', Barrett Browning', ‘Ice Follies', and ‘Thalia'. Go here to look up the varieties at DaffSeek and see for yourself how gorgeous they all are. I cannot wait to see them blooming.

I do have a favorite daffodil. It is a miniature narcissus called ‘Jetfire'. Theperianth* is stronglyreflexed, which means the petals are blowing backward. The corona is bright orange and points in the other direction. It is just a fabulous little flower. I highly recommend it!

So do not just settle for the boring varieties of daffodils you see in the big box stores, have a look out there and find something that excites the daffodil-lover in you.

 

 

*a fancy way of saying the outer parts of the flower, which are the sepals and petals.

 

Posted on Monday, February 6, 2023 at 2:06 PM

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