Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: pollinators

Rebecca Irwin: Role of Floral Traits in Pollination and Bee Disease Transmission

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen honey bees buzzing past you to reach a good nectar or pollen source. But there's much more to it than that. What's in that floral nectar...

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Dicks: The Importance of People in Pollinator Conservation

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The global decline of pollinators ought to concern everybody, and everybody ought to get involved, said bee conservation researcher Lynn Dicks of the...

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Keynote speaker Lynn Dicks (far left) of the School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom, with conference co-chair Neal Williams, pollination ecologist, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and speaker Rachel Vannette of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, who addressed the crowd on her hummingbird research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on
Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on "Implementing a Honeybee Foraging Model and REDAPOLL Fruit Set Predictions in Washington State's Decision Aid System." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Vince Jones (far right) of Washington State University, Pullman, Wash., addressing the crowd on "Implementing a Honeybee Foraging Model and REDAPOLL Fruit Set Predictions in Washington State's Decision Aid System." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's break time in the ARC Ballroom, UC Davis, for the attendees at the International Pollinator Conference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A reception for the crowd at the International Pollinator Conference. The site: the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center, Robert Mondavi Institute. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Discussing the conference are these members of the Neal Williams lab. From left pollination ecologist Neal Williams, professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and Nick Rosenberger, Colin Fagan and Anna Britzman. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)
Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)

Keynote speaker Christina Grozinger (left), distinguished professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research, Pennsylvania State University, with conference co-chair Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. Grozinger served as Niño's major professor at Penn State. (Photo by Mea McNeil)

The organizers: From left are Elizabeth
The organizers: From left are Elizabeth "Liz" Luu, events manager, UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center; conference co-chairs Elina Lastro Niño and Neal Williams of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology; and Amina Harris, director, the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The organizers: From left are Elizabeth "Liz" Luu, events manager, UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center; conference co-chairs Elina Lastro Niño and Neal Williams of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology; and Amina Harris, director, the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Third Graders Learn About Pollinators

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

(June 17-23 is National Pollinator Week.) "How many species of bees are there in the world?" asks Wendy Mather, program manager of the California...

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program explains the life cycle of bees to a group of third graders from Amador County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather (left) program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program shows the third graders how to use a bee vacuum in a catch-and-release activity. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I can see the bee! There it is! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What kind of butterfly is this? The answer: Monarch! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program (CAMBP), tells the students she hopes to see them study entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of
Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of "pollinator specialists" and engaged the students in creating a "pollinator." They then transferred "pollen" to different shaped flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Julia Wentzel introduced the concept of "pollinator specialists" and engaged the students in creating a "pollinator." They then transferred "pollen" to different shaped flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Volunteer Robin Lowry, who managed the “Planting for Pollinators” and “Be a Beekeeper” station, displays a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Students placed
Students placed "pollinators" inside flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Students placed "pollinators" inside flowers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to take a photo! Don't say
Time to take a photo! Don't say "cheese!" Say "honey!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to take a photo! Don't say "cheese!" Say "honey!" (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab,  presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab, presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Matthew Hoepfinger, staff research associate in the E. L. Niño lab, presented the live bee demonstration. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I'm a bee! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A little beekeeper shapes a heart. Students took turns trying on the beekeeper protective suits. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We depend on pollinators

The yellow-faced bumble bee (shown on foxglove), native to the west coast of North America, is an important pollinator. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Happy Pollinator Week! For 2019, it's June 17-23. Most people think of bees when they think pollination, but don't stop there. “Think the "b" alliteration: bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles. But don't forget the flies, ants, mosquitoes and moths!” writes Kathy Keatley Garvey in her Bug Squad blog.

Did you know…

  • Three-fourths of the world's flowering plants depend on pollinators
  • 35% of the food we eat depends on pollination by animal pollinators
  • There are 25,000 different species of bees
  • 1.6 million colonies of honey bees are needed to pollinate California's 800,000 acres of almond trees.
  • Honey bees will fly up to 4 miles from the hive to collect water, nectar and pollens.

“Loss of a species, especially a pollinator, diminishes our global environment,” said the late bee expert Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, in a 2010 interview. “Bumble bees provide an important ecological service--pollination. This service is critical to reproduction of a huge diversity of plants that in turn provide shelter, food (seeds, fruits) to diverse wildlife. The potential cascade of effects from the removal of even one localized pollinator may affect us directly and indirectly.”

Launched 12 years ago, National Pollinator Week focuses on the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles, according to Pollinator Partnership, which manages the national celebration. Other pollinators include syrphid or hover flies, mosquitoes, moths, pollen wasps and ants. They transfer pollen from the male anther of a flower to the female stigma.

Mexican long-tongued bat is a pollinator. Photo by Steve Buchmann

Bats are very important pollinators in tropical and desert climates. More than 300 species of fruit depend on bats for pollination.

UC ANR's California Naturalist Program promotes environmental literacy and stewardship through discovery and action. To become a certified California Naturalist, participants enroll in a course with one of our partner organizations. To receive certification, every UC California Naturalist completes a capstone project that benefits nature. Many California Naturalist projects benefit pollinators. For example, California Naturalist Cynthia from the USC Sea Grant SEA LAB course made houses to support native mason bee population in Palos Verdes. She made the bee houses out of repurposed scrap wood and cardboard, paper coat hanger tubes, used toilet paper and paper towel rolls, and giftwrap rolls.

To create habitat for pollinators in your garden, the UC Master Garden Program recommends planting a variety of plants to provide diverse sources of nectar and pollen. The UC Master Gardener volunteers in San Mateo and San Francisco counties have compiled a list of pollinator-friendly plants.

The UC Master Gardener volunteers also collected data on pollinator habitat in California by zip code and created an interactive map.

UC Master Gardener volunteers also collected data on pollinator habitat in California by zip code and created an interactive map.

 

Posted on Friday, June 21, 2019 at 4:46 PM
Tags: pollinators (44)
Focus Area Tags: Natural Resources

California Naturalists' efforts benefit pollinators

'Attention is the beginning of devotion' --Mary Oliver

This quote resonates this month, amidst a variety of environmental holidays and celebrations including World Environment Day, World Ocean Day, California Invasive Species Action Week, and finally National Pollinator Week (this week) and Month. It seems in this increasingly digitally connected world, one day, week, or month doesn't pass us by in the calendar year without an official opportunity to observe, act, or celebrate nature.

As these official observances pop up, we can also contemplate all the unofficial ways people celebrate, protect, and educate about nature in their daily lives. There are both small and incremental and heroic acts taken every day to make this a more livable world for all creatures. There is momentum behind a movement that says “we're paying attention and the environment is worth our time and energy and devotion despite all the other worthy competing causes.”

In celebration of National Pollinator Week, we want to highlight just a few of the many California Naturalists whose efforts benefit pollinators. Every UC California Naturalist completes a capstone project of their choice to receive certification. These final projects require at least eight hours of volunteer service, and are often built upon by subsequent naturalists in following cohorts. They always benefit nature, and often benefit the recipient communities and organizations. Most California Naturalists would tell you they benefit the individual, too. Capstone projects are a culmination of service, learning, and “paying it forward.” Our community celebrates both the projects and the creativity, labor, and intentions of these naturalists.

Inspired by the intersection of science and art, California Naturalist Rose from the Hopland Research and Extension Center created this gorgeous outreach poster in both English and Spanish from her original pollinator garden painting for the Redwood Valley Outdoor Education Project. Her goal is to spread awareness of the important ecological roll our native pollinators play and to share Xerces Society resources. Animal pollinators include bees, butterflies, moths, wasps, flies, beetles, ants, bats and hummingbirds. According to Xerces Society, the ecological services that pollinators provide is necessary for the reproduction of over 85% of the world's flowering plants, including more than two-thirds of the world's crop species. Honeybees get a lot of media attention, yet many other pollinator species like native bumblebees are in precipitous decline. The UC Berkeley Urban Bee Lab is another excellent source of native bee information.

California Naturalist Cynthia from the USC Sea Grant SEA LAB course made houses to support native mason bee population in Palos Verdes, CA. The bee houses were made from repurposed scrap wood and cardboard, paper coat hanger tubes, used toilet paper and paper towel rolls, and giftwrap rolls. She reached out to a local Girl Scout troop to help make three types of houses. The Girl Scouts leveraged the new learning opportunity and service work to receive an "Outdoor Journeys" badge. Then she met with four kindergarten classes of 24 students each and together built houses to take home. The houses in the picture aren't examples of her model but were ones she found online.

California Naturalist Cynthia showed a local Girl Scout troop how to make three types of houses to support native mason bees. The bee houses were made from repurposed scrap wood and cardboard, paper coat hanger tubes, used toilet paper and paper towel rolls, and giftwrap rolls.

Mason bees are solitary bees named for their behavior of using mud in constructing their nests. Mason bees may defy some assumptions about bees. They don't sting, they don't live in a hive, and they don't make honey. They do, however pollinate flowers and fruits and vegetables and need a safe place to lay their eggs. When available, some species use hollow stems or holes in wood made by wood-boring insects which is where mason bee houses come into the picture. UC Davis Department of Entomology compiled this list of resources on where to find and how to make nesting sites for native bees.

Sue from the Tuleyome course built bat boxes for her local home owners association to hang in Arnold, Calaveras County. At least 45 species of bats inhabit the United States and Canada and there are at least 27 known species of bats in California. Bats are very important pollinators and seed dispersers, particularly in tropical and desert climates. In addition, they serve a very effective agricultural pest control purpose. Although they provide vital environmental services, bat populations are in decline globally. To make your own bat boxes, UC ANR offers a guide to build songbird, owl and bat boxes.

Bat boxes can be constructed to attract bats, which are very important pollinators and seed dispersers.
 
Hummingbirds, along with other birds, bats and insects, are pollinators.
Posted on Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 6:15 PM
  • Author: Brook Gamble
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu