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Beekeepers Among Those Benefiting from Vacaville Fire Art Project

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled

Some lost everything: Their homes, their barns, their farm animals, their bees, their livelihoods. The recent wildfire that roared through...

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled
Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting,
A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled
Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled
A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

Posted on Friday, September 25, 2020 at 3:21 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Beauty of the Bee

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla

Have you ever pulled up a chair in your garden and watched honey bees foraging? They are so intent on their "bees-ness" that they don't know you're...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Clay's Bees: The Bees, They're Gone

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

The bees, they're gone. Beekeeper Clay Ford, who owns the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as "Clay's Bees," is devastated. The...

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)
These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2020 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Yard & Garden

Nighty-Night, Mr. Bumble Bee!

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a bumble bee sleeping? If you slip out to your garden at night or early morning, you might find the male bumble bees asleep in,...

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 20, 2020 at 5:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

So Bee It...

A honey bee heads toward a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bees love it. So do the long-horned bees, bumble bees, carpenter bees, European paper wasps, syrphid flies, butterflies, blister...

A honey bee heads toward a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads toward a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads toward a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, this Mexican sunflower is all mine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ah, this Mexican sunflower is all mine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, this Mexican sunflower is all mine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It pays to keep a lookout while you're foraging on the ever-popular Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It pays to keep a lookout while you're foraging on the ever-popular Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It pays to keep a lookout while you're foraging on the ever-popular Mexican sunflower, genus Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 6, 2020 at 5:35 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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