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Posts Tagged: spring

A Bee-Line to the Bohart Museum: T-Shirts and Calendars

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Folks are making a bee-line to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, for its spring sale. All proceeds support the insect...

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 18, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Family, Innovation

UC Davis Spring Seminars: from Fruit Flies to Ants to Spider Glue and More!

A fruit fly, spotted wing drosophila, on a raspberry. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's first spring seminar is on fruit flies.  Alistair McGregor of Oxford Brookes University, England, will speak. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo, assistant professor of entomology, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, has lined up the...

A fruit fly, spotted wing drosophila, on a raspberry. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's first spring seminar is on fruit flies.  Alistair McGregor of Oxford Brookes University, England, will speak. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A fruit fly, spotted wing drosophila, on a raspberry. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's first spring seminar is on fruit flies. Alistair McGregor of Oxford Brookes University, England, will speak. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A fruit fly, spotted wing drosophila, on a raspberry. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's first spring seminar is on fruit flies. Alistair McGregor of Oxford Brookes University, England, will speak. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 25, 2019 at 5:49 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Pest Management

Rain Won't Cancel Open House, Plant Sale at UC Davis Bee Garden

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be  offered at the  Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think spring. Think ceanothus. Think salvia. Think pollinators. Despite the rain forecast, the open house and plant sale at...

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be  offered at the  Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be offered at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be offered at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, aka
A male Valley carpenter bee, aka "the teddy bear bee" or Xylocopa varipuncta, takes a liking to penstemon, a popular plant at the UC Davis Arboretum Nursery plant sale. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, aka "the teddy bear bee" or Xylocopa varipuncta, takes a liking to penstemon, a popular plant at the UC Davis Arboretum Nursery plant sale. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 6, 2018 at 4:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

It's Tough Being a Bee During the Springlike Rains

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's tough being a bee--especially when you have work to do and the rain won't let you out of your hive. But when there's a sun break, it's...

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Food, Natural Resources

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on March 10; Why Not Think Gaillardia?

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've been thinking about blanketing your garden with blanketflower (Gaillardia), you're in luck. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is...

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly,  Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a  hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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