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Posts Tagged: plants

Rebecca Irwin: Role of Floral Traits in Pollination and Bee Disease Transmission

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen honey bees buzzing past you to reach a good nectar or pollen source. But there's much more to it than that. What's in that floral nectar...

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an  Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's in store for this honey bee? It is heading for an Anisodontea sp.'Strybing Beauty.' Image taken in pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bay Area Bee Fair on Oct. 13: The Place to 'Bee'

Black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on nectarine blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a fair. It's a party. It's a pollinator party. It's the Bay Area Bee Fair in Berkeley. And it's the place to be on Sunday, Oct. 13 at the...

Black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on nectarine blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on nectarine blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on nectarine blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus  vosnesenskii, nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, nectaring on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bee, Bombus californicus, nectaring on blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bee, Bombus californicus, nectaring on blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bee, Bombus californicus, nectaring on blanket flower, Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, and honey bee, Apis mellifera, sharing a purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, and honey bee, Apis mellifera, sharing a purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, and honey bee, Apis mellifera, sharing a purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

International symposium will explore air pollution’s effect on plants

Air pollution is visible from the Berkeley Hills.
Air pollution is harmful to the health of people and animals. That much we know, but how does air pollution affect plants?

Scientists from 25 countries will gather on the Monterey Peninsula to discuss “Plants and the Changing Environment” in June. The 9th Air Pollution and Global Change Symposium will be held June 8-12 at the Asilomar Conference Center in Pacific Grove.

The goal of the series is to consider interactions of air pollution and global change and their impacts on vegetation.

“The symposium is unique in dealing with effects at all levels from molecular and cellular mechanisms, whole plant and crop impacts, all the way up to models of ecosystem and regional impacts,” said David A. Grantz, UC Cooperative Extension specialist based in the Department of Botany & Plant Sciences at UC Riverside.

The symposia are held every few years in different countries, the last in Groningen, The Netherlands, in 2011. The event in California is being organized by Grantz and Kent O. Burkey, USDA/ARS plant physiologist and North Carolina State University professor of crop science and botany in Raleigh.

UC scientists and students engaged in research on the interactions of plant function, metabolism and communities with environmental pollution and global change are encouraged to attend.

“This is an important opportunity for U.S. scientists because the last time this symposium was held in the U.S. was in 1992,” said Grantz. “This is a great chance to catch up on the physiological ecology and modeling efforts underway in Europe and Asia.”

The confirmed keynote speakers include

  • Dennis Baldocchi, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  • Lisa Emberson, Stockholm Environment Institute and University of York, U.K.
  • Lisa Ainsworth, USDA/ARS and University of Illinois, USA
  • Koike Takayoshi, Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Harry Harmens, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Environment Centre Wales, U.K.
  • Allen Lefohn, ASL and Associates, USA
  • Atul Jain, University of Illinois, USA
  • Rainer Matyssek, Technische Universitat Munchen, Germany

The deadline for abstracts, registration and lodging is March 31. The agenda, registration and housing information can be found at WWW.APGC.EU.

 

Posted on Friday, February 14, 2014 at 4:28 PM

Your Wish Will Come True Saturday, Feb. 8

A walking stick being fed a leaf at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How many times have you walked around the University of California, Davis campus on a weekend and wished: "If only those buildings were open--I'd...

A walking stick being fed a leaf at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A walking stick being fed a leaf at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A walking stick being fed a leaf at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 4, 2014 at 9:49 PM
Tags: birds (14), insects (55), plants (38), UC Davis Biodiversity Day (2)

Scottish Surprises

Some things I expected on our recent trip to Scotland in early October.  I knew that the thistle was the national flower.  I had heard about the rowan tree from my mother in law. It was nice to see it in person and find it with a full flush of red berries. Since we were going in October I wasn't quite sure what else to expect.

The first thing I noticed was begonias of all colors in municipal and business plantings.  They tended to be planted in large masses as well as hanging planters. The next observations were made on a hike through the Pass of Killiecrankie which links the highlands and the lowlands of Scotland. This wooded area was bursting with fungi and mushrooms. I even found the mushroom from all the fairy tales the one with the white stem and red cap with white polka-dots. I was also impressed with the amount of ruby red rose hips from wild Rosa canina that we saw here and throughout Scotland. I could only imagine how beautiful these must be in flower in the springtime.

We visited Dunrobin Castle which has some beautiful gardens supposedly inspired by Versailles.  I was shocked to find Gunnera mannicata, Giant Rhubarb flourishing there.  I generally think of these in South America or trendy garden show displays not Scottish gardens.   Later I was astounded to see a six foot tall Viking topiary made of succulents on the greens of a town named Largs. Largs was the site of a famous Viking-Scottish battle. The grounds also had a flat" picture" of a Viking battleship, also done in succulents. 

I think that is one of the things I like best about traveling, the surprises you encounter that go against your expectations. They shake you up a bit and make you look at everything with fresher eyes.  And if you are lucky, that feeling can continue on when you get home.

Rowan tree. (photos by Karen Metz)
Rowan tree. (photos by Karen Metz)

'Fairy tale' mushroom. (Amanita muscaria)
'Fairy tale' mushroom. (Amanita muscaria)

Rose hips on Rosa canina.
Rose hips on Rosa canina.

Gunnera mannicata.
Gunnera mannicata.

Begonias in a multitude of colors.
Begonias in a multitude of colors.

Largs.
Largs.

Posted on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 8:43 AM
Tags: plants (38), Scotland (1)

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