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Posts Tagged: Verbena

Just Look, Don't Take?

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When we last left Ms. Mantis, a female Stagmomantis limbata residing in our verbena patch, she was munching on a honey bee. A successful ambush...

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a mourning cloak butterfly nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by praying mantis expert Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) eyes a duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectaring on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, really wants this mourning cloak butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Whoa, where did it go? It was in my sights and now it's gone." The praying mantis loses her prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Safe and sound. The duskywing butterfly, genus Erynnis, nectars on a blossom away from the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2019 at 4:06 PM

Victory in the Verbena

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, I'm hungry. A female praying mantis is perched upside down in our pollinator garden. She has maintained this position in the verbena over a...

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female praying mantis, a Stagmomantis limbata (as identified by Lohit Garikipati of UC Davis) is looking for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Seconds later, the praying mantis nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, begins to eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A freeloader fly, (family Milichiidae and probably genus Desmometopa) perches on a spiked foreleg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis eats the last of her prey, while the freeloader fly is out of luck. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All gone and done. The praying mantis is finished with her meal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 3:00 PM

Welcome, Anise Swallowtail!

Anise Swallowtail Papilio zelicaon, nectaring on Verbena in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Anise Swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, fluttered into our pollinator garden and headed straight for the Verbena. Art Shapiro, distinguished...

Anise Swallowtail Papilio zelicaon, nectaring on Verbena in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Anise Swallowtail Papilio zelicaon, nectaring on Verbena in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Anise Swallowtail Papilio zelicaon, nectaring on Verbena in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly ballet! Bees startled this Anise Swallowtail that was nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterfly ballet! Bees startled this Anise Swallowtail that was nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly ballet! Bees startled this Anise Swallowtail that was nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for the same Verbena blossom occupied by the Anise Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for the same Verbena blossom occupied by the Anise Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for the same Verbena blossom occupied by the Anise Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 5, 2018 at 6:12 PM

They Hop and They Suck!

Two leafhoppers sharing a black sage leaf in Vacaville, Calif. They are Typhlocybinae leafhoppers, Eupteryx decemnotata, according to Robert Lord Zimlich of BugGuide.Net.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You've seen them. You've seen them hop. They're aptly named. Leafhoppers are tiny insects (family Cicadellidae) that suck nutrients from...

Two leafhoppers sharing a black sage leaf in Vacaville, Calif. They are Typhlocybinae leafhoppers, Eupteryx decemnotata, according to Robert Lord Zimlich of BugGuide.Net.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two leafhoppers sharing a black sage leaf in Vacaville, Calif. They are Typhlocybinae leafhoppers, Eupteryx decemnotata, according to Robert Lord Zimlich of BugGuide.Net. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two leafhoppers sharing a black sage leaf in Vacaville, Calif. They are Typhlocybinae leafhoppers, Eupteryx decemnotata, according to Robert Lord Zimlich of BugGuide.Net. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Leafhoppers generally are varying shades of green, yellow, or brown, and often mottled," according to the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program. This one is a Eupteryx decemnotata on black sage (Salvia mellifera) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Leafhoppers generally are varying shades of green, yellow, or brown, and often mottled," according to the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program. This one is a Eupteryx decemnotata on black sage (Salvia mellifera) in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Day the First Bumble Bee Arrived

Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii), foraging on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When the monarchs return to southern California and central Mexico to overwinter, the residents rejoice. When the bumble bees emerge from their...

Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii), foraging on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii), foraging on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yellow-faced bumble bee (Bombus vosnesenskii), foraging on verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Its wings glistening, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sips nectar.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Its wings glistening, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sips nectar.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Its wings glistening, the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sips nectar.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 2, 2016 at 5:08 PM
 
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