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Posts Tagged: Davis

Chemical Ecologist to Speak at UC Davis on 'The Smells of Dinner, Death, and Danger'

Nymphs of the squash bug, Anasa tristis, an insect that chemical ecologist Anjel Helms studies. (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)

The title is intriguing: "The Smells of Dinner, Death, and Danger: How Organisms Navigate Multitrophic Interactions in a Chemical...

Nymphs of the squash bug, Anasa tristis, an insect that chemical ecologist Anjel Helms studies. (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)
Nymphs of the squash bug, Anasa tristis, an insect that chemical ecologist Anjel Helms studies. (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)

Nymphs of the squash bug, Anasa tristis, an insect that chemical ecologist Anjel Helms studies. (Image courtesy of Wikipedia)

Congrats to the Thrips Team!

Professor Diane Ullman of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is a co-author of the publication on the Western flower thrips. This image was taken when she was doing research in France.

Congratulations to the international team of scientists, including UC Davis entomologist and co-author Diane Ullman, on their publication...

Professor Diane Ullman of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is a co-author of the publication on the Western flower thrips. This image was taken when she was doing research in France.
Professor Diane Ullman of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is a co-author of the publication on the Western flower thrips. This image was taken when she was doing research in France.

Professor Diane Ullman of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is a co-author of the publication on the Western flower thrips. This image was taken when she was doing research in France.

Posted on Friday, October 23, 2020 at 5:07 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Geoffrey Attardo: Invasive Mosquito Populations Moving Throughout California

Aedes aegypti, also known as

A virtual seminar to be hosted by the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology on Wednesday, Oct. 21 should draw widespread interest,...

Aedes aegypti, also known as
Aedes aegypti, also known as "the yellow fever mosquito." (CDC Photo)

Aedes aegypti, also known as "the yellow fever mosquito." (CDC Photo)

Aedes albopictus, known as the Asian tiger mosquito. (CDC Photo)
Aedes albopictus, known as the Asian tiger mosquito. (CDC Photo)

Aedes albopictus, known as the Asian tiger mosquito. (CDC Photo)

Posted on Saturday, October 17, 2020 at 3:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Pest Management

On the Fly

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies seem to be in the news a lot lately. But have you ever looking closely at a common green bottle fly Lucilia sericata, also known as a...

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A common green bottle fly, Lucilia sericata, seeking nectar on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green bottle fly sips some nectar from a tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Flies can be pollinators, too, but they're better known for their forensic, veterinary and medical importance. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a green bottle fly sipping nectar from a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 16, 2020 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

Bohart Museum Virtual Open House: Think Pests of Alfalfa and Rice

Cooperative Extension specialist Ian Grettenberger at work in his lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mark your calendar. The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, is hosting a virtual open house dealing with...

Cooperative Extension specialist Ian Grettenberger at work in his lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cooperative Extension specialist Ian Grettenberger at work in his lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cooperative Extension specialist Ian Grettenberger at work in his lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Graduate student Madi Hendrick sweeping an alfalfa field for pests.
Graduate student Madi Hendrick sweeping an alfalfa field for pests.

Graduate student Madi Hendrick sweeping an alfalfa field for pests.

In its adult form, the alfalfa butterfly is attractive. In its larval form, it's a pest of alfalfa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In its adult form, the alfalfa butterfly is attractive. In its larval form, it's a pest of alfalfa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In its adult form, the alfalfa butterfly is attractive. In its larval form, it's a pest of alfalfa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 15, 2020 at 4:57 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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