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Posts Tagged: drone flies

Umm, Where's the Bee?

If there's one thing that entomologists hate, it's journalists who mistake a fly for a bee. To entomologists, it's like mistaking a referee for a...

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax (left),  and a syrphid fly. They're from the same family, Syrphidae, and are often mistaken for honey bees.. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A drone fly, Eristalis tenax (left), and a syrphid fly. They're from the same family, Syrphidae, and are often mistaken for honey bees.. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A drone fly, Eristalis tenax (left), and a syrphid fly. They're from the same family, Syrphidae and are often mistaken for honey bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee collecting pollen. Lower right: a freeloader fly.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee collecting pollen. Lower right: a freeloader fly.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee collecting pollen. Lower right: a freeloader fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy  Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly.  Note the setae or bristle on the head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly. Note the setae or bristle on the head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly. Note the setae or bristle on the head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 8, 2015 at 5:49 PM
Tags: drone flies (4), honey bees (440), hover flies (7)

A Fly Is a Fly Is a Fly

A bee is a bee is a bee is a bee. 'Cept when it's a fly. Lately we've been seeing lots of images on social media (including Facebook and Twitter),...

Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly, Eristalis tenax, sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The
The "H" is easily seen on the drone fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The "H" is easily seen on the drone fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Drone fly heads for another blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 20, 2014 at 9:03 PM

To Bee or Not to Bee

To bee or not to bee. Not to bee. The flying insect hovering over the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden,  UC Davis Arboretum, looked like a honey bee...

Like a hovering helicopter, the hover fly lingers over flowers in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Like a hovering helicopter, the hover fly lingers over flowers in the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The hover fly, from the syrphid family, works the flowers in the Storer Garden, part of the UC Davis Arboretum. The syphrids, in their larval stage, eat plant-sucking pests or decaying matter, and in their adult stage, they pollinate flowers as they go after the  nectar and pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The hover fly, from the syrphid family, works the flowers in the Storer Garden, part of the UC Davis Arboretum. The syphrids, in their larval stage, eat plant-sucking pests or decaying matter, and in their adult stage, they pollinate flowers as they go after the nectar and pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 16, 2008 at 1:38 PM
Tags: aviator (1), drone flies (4), flower flies (7), hover flies (7), syphrids (1), Syrphidae (8)
Focus Area Tags: Environment

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