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Posts Tagged: Tithonia

Spotted Cucumber Beetles: They Know How to Hit the Spot

Western spotted cucumber beetles know how to hit the spot. Make that "multiple spots."  These...

Wide angle shot of a western spotted cucumber beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, chewing a hole in a petal of a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wide angle shot of a western spotted cucumber beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, chewing a hole in a petal of a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wide angle shot of a western spotted cucumber beetle, Diabrotica undecimpunctata, chewing a hole in a petal of a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle chewing a hole in a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle chewing a hole in a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle chewing a hole in a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Mexican sunflower you wouldn't want to enter in a county fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end result: a Mexican sunflower you wouldn't want to enter in a county fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Mexican sunflower you wouldn't want to enter in a county fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a western spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 4, 2022 at 10:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

A Crab Spider and a Bee

Oh, the patience of a crab spider. It lies in wait on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, in the hot sun. It scuttles back and forth,...

A crab spider on a Mexican sunflower is ready to ambush prey.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider on a Mexican sunflower is ready to ambush prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider on a Mexican sunflower is ready to ambush prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider scuttles back and forth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider scuttles back and forth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider scuttles back and forth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar and pollen, lands on the Mexican sunflower, unaware of the predator. It quickly buzzed off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, seeking nectar and pollen, lands on the Mexican sunflower, unaware of the predator. It quickly buzzed off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar and pollen, lands on the Mexican sunflower, unaware of the predator. It quickly buzzed off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 at 4:31 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Sky-High Caterpillar

When you're in your garden, look up. Sometimes you'll see a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar outlined against the sky, munching away on its host...

A sky-high Gulf Fritillary caterpillar munches on a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sky-high Gulf Fritillary caterpillar munches on a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sky-high Gulf Fritillary caterpillar munches on a passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars vying for the same twig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars vying for the same twig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillary caterpillars vying for the same twig. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The adult Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, is spectacular. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The adult Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, is spectacular. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The adult Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, is spectacular. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Its silver-spangled wings gleaming, a Gulf Fritillary touches down on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Its silver-spangled wings gleaming, a Gulf Fritillary touches down on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Its silver-spangled wings gleaming, a Gulf Fritillary touches down on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 19, 2022 at 4:13 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Meet a Longhorned Bee

Picture this. A female Melissodes agilis, the so-called "agile longhorned bee," is foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia...

A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 4:58 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

No 'Assassination' Today!

No assassinations today! But an "assassination attempt." There it was, a leafhopper assassin bug, Zelus renardii,  waiting for prey...

An assassin bug, Zelus renardii,waits to ambush prey on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug, Zelus renardii,waits to ambush prey on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug, Zelus renardii,waits to ambush prey on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorned bee arrives for some nectar while the assassin bug watches in apparent anticipation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A longhorned bee arrives for some nectar while the assassin bug watches in apparent anticipation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorned bee arrives for some nectar while the assassin bug watches in apparent anticipation. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee leaves only its shadow behind. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The longhorned bee leaves only its shadow behind. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee leaves only its shadow behind. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This assassin bug had more luck--or better ambushing skills. It nails a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This assassin bug had more luck--or better ambushing skills. It nails a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This assassin bug had more luck--or better ambushing skills. It nails a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 7, 2022 at 6:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

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