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Posts Tagged: Solano County

Solano County Fair, June 15-18: Bees, Butterflies and More

You might not expect to see Anthocharis sara sara in McCormack Hall during the 74th annual Solano County Fair, Vallejo, June 15-18.  But you...

A clerk at McCormack Hall, Solano County Fair, displays two junior division photos: one of a honey bee by Jesse Means of Dixon, and the other of a orange-tip butterfly by Regan Van Tuyl of Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A clerk at McCormack Hall, Solano County Fair, displays two junior division photos: one of a honey bee by Jesse Means of Dixon, and the other of a orange-tip butterfly by Regan Van Tuyl of Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A clerk at McCormack Hall, Solano County Fair, displays two junior division photos: one of a honey bee by Jesse Means of Dixon, and the other of a orange-tip butterfly by Regan Van Tuyl of Dixon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a portion of a painting by Caitlin Douglas of Vallejo. It's titled
This is a portion of a painting by Caitlin Douglas of Vallejo. It's titled "Clover Honey."

This is a portion of a painting by Caitlin Douglas of Vallejo. It's titled "Clover Honey."

McCormack Hall superintendent Sharon Payne (left) and daughter Julianna Payne Brown, assistant superintendent, display a quilt.
McCormack Hall superintendent Sharon Payne (left) and daughter Julianna Payne Brown, assistant superintendent, display a quilt.

McCormack Hall superintendent Sharon Payne (left) and daughter Julianna Payne Brown, assistant superintendent, display a quilt.

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2023 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Workshops for forest landowners come to Solano, Sacramento counties, beginning July 18

UC ANR Forestry Advisor Mike Jones leads a field day group of Forest Stewardship Workshop participants in Sonoma County. Sonoma County has an oak woodland ecosystem similar to that found in Solano and Sacramento counties. Photo by Kim Ingram

Free forester site visit for landowners who complete workshop series

Forest landowners in Solano and Sacramento counties are encouraged to learn about their forests and connect with natural resource professionals in their areas during the next Forest Stewardship Workshop Series from University of California Cooperative Extension, July 18 to Sept. 12. These programs can be essential for small landowners who seek to make their forests resilient against wildfire.

Upon completing the nine-week series of virtual and in-person sessions, landowners also will be eligible for a free site visit from a local Registered Professional Forester (RPF), Certified Range Manager or California Certified Burn Boss.

Content is applicable to all forest landowners regardless of where their forest is located and will highlight talks from the local Resource Conservation District, UCCE forestry advisors, CAL FIRE, Natural Resources Conservation Service, and other natural resources community leaders. Registration fee is $60 for the workshop series, which will address common concerns among California landowners, including but not limited to:

  • Forest ecology and vegetation management
  • Financial planning and cost-sharing opportunities
  • Oak woodland management and targeted grazing

Past participants have rated the workshop series highly, with 98% of 2022 participants rating the series overall as excellent or very good. In addition, 94% of past participants reported greater awareness of applying for and using cost-sharing programs.

A past participant has described the workshops as very accessible, saying “they (UCCE) broke things down into small pieces, [and] staff were always an email away.” In seeking to make an otherwise large amount of content approachable, UCCE hopes that landowners come away with a holistic understanding of the management process.

The workshop will take place in a hybrid setting, with classes taking place weekly online over Zoom. Participants will also engage in practical learning through a field day, where they can meet other cohort members and UCCE professionals at an outdoor field location.

At the conclusion of the workshop series, landowners will be equipped with the knowledge and network that will empower them to manage their forests in ways that meet their specific goals and objectives.

Community members in Sacramento and Solano counties interested in forest management, forest and fire ecology, and related topics are encouraged to register: https://surveys.ucanr.edu/survey.cfm?surveynumber=28675.

Forest landowners across California can learn about upcoming workshops in their areas, and also find additional resources, publications and videos: https://ucanr.edu/sites/forestry/Stewardship/.

Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2023 at 9:36 AM
  • Author: Grace Dean, Forest Stewardship Communications Specialist
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

In Search of the First Bumble Bee of the Year

What are you doing on New Year's Day? Well, weather permitting, you can begin searching for the first bumble bee of the year in the two-county area...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 29, 2022 at 2:56 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Checkered Past, a Checkered Future or Just Checkered?

Have you seen any Checkered White butterflies lately? They're quite common in the southern United States and northern Mexico (they're known as the...

A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice (as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro) nectars on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice (as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro) nectars on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice (as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro) nectars on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Checkered White spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female Checkered White spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Checkered White spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice nectaring on lavender.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Checkered White butterfly, Pontia protodice nectaring on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Checkered White showing a rejection behavior although no males are around.
The female Checkered White showing a rejection behavior although no males are around. "The 'tail in the air' is a sexual rejection posture," says UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Checkered White showing a rejection behavior although no males are around. "The 'tail in the air' is a sexual rejection posture," says UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 30, 2022 at 12:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Sneak Peak at a Couple of Solano County Fair Entries

A sneak peak at a couple of Solano County Fair entries...think insects! The COVID-19 pandemic derailed fairs and festivals, but now they're back on...

Heather DeGroot of Vallejo, coordinator of the McCormack Hall exhibits, Solano County Fair, shows a watercolor by Richard Laswell of Rio Vista that depicts three dragonflies. In back is an oils-acrylic butterfly by Ashley Workman of Vallejo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Heather DeGroot of Vallejo, coordinator of the McCormack Hall exhibits, Solano County Fair, shows a watercolor by Richard Laswell of Rio Vista that depicts three dragonflies. In back is an oils-acrylic butterfly by Ashley Workman of Vallejo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heather DeGroot of Vallejo, coordinator of the McCormack Hall exhibits, Solano County Fair, shows a watercolor by Richard Laswell of Rio Vista that depicts three dragonflies. In back is an oils-acrylic butterfly by Ashley Workman of Vallejo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heather DeGroot displays an image of a syrphid fly and honey bee, the work of 17-year-old Matthew Agbayani of the Vaca Valley 4-H Club, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Heather DeGroot displays an image of a syrphid fly and honey bee, the work of 17-year-old Matthew Agbayani of the Vaca Valley 4-H Club, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Heather DeGroot displays an image of a syrphid fly and honey bee, the work of 17-year-old Matthew Agbayani of the Vaca Valley 4-H Club, Vacaville.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talented artist Iris Mayhew of American Canyon entered these pieces in the Solano County Fair. She drew inspiration from her safari in Kenya. Her work will be displayed June 16-19 in McCormack Hall. She'll be depicting monarchs and Gulf Fritillaries next. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Talented artist Iris Mayhew of American Canyon entered these pieces in the Solano County Fair. She drew inspiration from her safari in Kenya. Her work will be displayed June 16-19 in McCormack Hall. She'll be depicting monarchs and Gulf Fritillaries next. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talented artist Iris Mayhew of American Canyon entered these pieces in the Solano County Fair. She drew inspiration from her safari in Kenya. Her work will be displayed June 16-19 in McCormack Hall. She'll be depicting monarchs and Gulf Fritillaries next. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid flies are often mistaken for honey bees. Here a fly shares a blanketflower (Gaillardia) with a jumping spider, unaware of its presence. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Syrphid flies are often mistaken for honey bees. Here a fly shares a blanketflower (Gaillardia) with a jumping spider, unaware of its presence. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid flies are often mistaken for honey bees. Here a fly shares a blanketflower (Gaillardia) with a jumping spider, unaware of its presence. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 13, 2022 at 4:13 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Yard & Garden

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