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Posts Tagged: forest

It's Friday Fly Day!

It's Friday Fly Day! And what better day than a Friday to post an image of a syrphid fly nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium...

A syrphid fly foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 12, 2022 at 7:50 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Study shows how restoring California's overstocked forests yields multiple, diverse benefits

The French Meadows Forest Restoration Project at the Tahoe National Forest is depicted on July 6, 2022. Photo by Roger Bales.

Mechanical thinning of overstocked forests, prescribed burning and managed wildfire now being carried out to enhance fire protection of California's forests provide many benefits, or ecosystem services, that people depend on.

In a paper published in Restoration Ecology, researchers at UC Merced, UC ANR and UC Irvine reported that stakeholders perceived fire protection as central to forest restoration, with multiple other ecosystem services also depending on wildfire severity. Researcher Max Eriksson, lead author on the paper, noted that "forest restoration involves multiple fuels-reduction actions that were perceived as benefiting fire protection, with some also offering strong benefits to other ecosystem services such as air quality, wildlife habitat, soil retention and water supply."

The study showed that the total effect of an action such as mechanical thinning of forests aimed at reducing fuels includes not only the direct effect on reducing wildfire severity, but also secondary effects that improving fire protection has on benefits such as providing water and hydroelectricity for agriculture and communities across the state or storing carbon and reducing carbon-dioxide emissions from wildfire to the atmosphere. Fire management is therefore central to human well-being.

Across the western United States, researchers are addressing the huge challenge of transforming forest management from the historical goal of maximum resource extraction (e.g., timber production) to a paradigm built on multiple benefits, or ecosystem services.

The study involved a series of virtual workshops with natural-resource professionals, including forest managers, to understand their perceived effects of management actions on ecosystem services and the interactions of the various services. Eleven ecosystem services and nine currently used management actions were considered.

A tour of the French Meadows Forest Restoration Project at the Tahoe National Forest is carried out on June 21, 2022. Photo by Brie Anne Coleman, Placer County Water Agency

Safeeq Khan, co-author and UC ANR Cooperative Extension specialist in water and watershed sciences, adds, "Understanding both actual and perceived benefits provided by restoring overstocked forests is crucial to guiding the choice of management actions, public support, policy initiatives and investments by beneficiaries, i.e., monetizing ecosystem services."

UC Merced Professor and co-author Roger Bales points out that "reducing fuel loads is increasingly being recognized as an effective measure to transition our forests across the western United States from a destructive to a beneficial wildfire regime."

Bales adds, "Our research supports the perception that California's wildfire-vulnerable forests should primarily and urgently be restored to conditions that better regulate wildfire severity, and thus provide greater fire protection and other ecosystem-service benefits. Lower-severity wildfire is a natural and beneficial part of these ecosystems."

An important contribution of this study is the breadth of both ecosystem-service benefits and management actions considered. Study collaborator and ecosystem-service expert Benis Egoh, an assistant professor at UC Irvine, points out that, "This research recognized that given the complexity of forest ecosystems across the western United States, the investments required and the management constraints, increasing forest resilience requires a range of actions." She adds, "Accounting for perceived interactions of ecosystem services is key to multi-benefit valuation of restoration investments and to monetizing those benefits in equitable ways."

Posted on Wednesday, August 3, 2022 at 6:46 PM
  • Author: Lorena Anderson, UC Merced
Focus Area Tags: Environment

Free wildfire publication simplifies understanding fuel-reduction permits on private land

In this restoration treatment, encroaching conifers are removed from an oak woodland to bolster fire resilience. Photo by Jared Gerstein

UCCE forest advisor helps landowners, community groups determine best project options

As Californians prepare for another year of drought and an anticipated intense fire season, landowners and organizations across California have been working to reduce forest fuels – flammable woody material – that can endanger their properties and communities.

For many of them, however, their urgent efforts hit a sizable speed bump: a massive rulebook that describes, amid a thicket of other information, the permits required before people can treat or remove fuels – as well as a litany of attached requirements, restrictions and stipulations.

“The California Forest Practice Rules are 410 pages, in font size 6,” said Yana Valachovic, UC Cooperative Extension forest advisor for Humboldt and Del Norte counties and registered professional forester. “Trying to figure out what permit vehicles make sense in the rulebook is not easy even for the experienced professional forester.”

To assist private landowners and community groups in deciphering the rules and determining their most cost-effective options, Valachovic took the lead in writing a new guide, “Planning and Permitting Forest Fuel-Reduction Projects on Private Lands in California,” available as a free resource in the UC Agriculture and Natural Resources catalog.

A portion of the decision tree framework that breaks down what permit applicants should consider when weighing their choices.

“We tried to create a system where all the permits are laid out side-by-side, and put in a decision tree framework to help make it easier,” said Valachovic, highlighting the publication's tables that break down the project goals and parameters a permit applicant should think about when weighing their choices.

Considerations include whether the project is pre- or post-wildfire, the location and dimensions of trees targeted for removal, the conditions of the site before and after the project, potential time limits, commercial options, and, crucially, budget constraints – given that the permitting process could comprise up to one-third of total project costs.

A primer for planning and preparation

Chris Curtis, the unit forester for CAL FIRE's Humboldt-Del Norte Unit, said that he and his colleagues are grateful for this new tool and plan to use it as an “over the counter” handout for community members. He added that the charts summarizing timber-harvesting regulations and possible funding sources are especially helpful.

This cut-to-length harvester is useful for small-diameter tree harvesting. Photo by Yana Valachovic
“These give a landowner a starting place to sort through the many commercial timber harvesting documents and fuel-modification project funding source options available,” Curtis said. “A landowner is self-guided to a few options that will seem most appropriate, and this will facilitate a resource professional to assist that person in selecting the most appropriate permitting.”

The publication helps prepare the landowner or community entity (such as Resource Conservation Districts, Fire Safe Councils or other concerned groups) for the types of questions that might come up in preliminary planning conversations with a registered professional forester or RPF.

Just as a homeowner would talk with a contractor before tackling a construction project, landowners and community groups must consult with an RPF, Valachovic said. RPFs have the specialized knowledge of forest practice rules and regulations related to water, air quality and endangered species protections, and the license to file the permitting documents.

“That's what I do in my job: Landowners come to me and we start talking about goals and objectives,” she said. “We start thinking about potential timelines – which goals are short-term, which are long-term – and how we can put an operational plan together to help those landowners achieve their goals.”

Long-term projects, short-term actions

Among the many practical tips outlined in this guide, Valachovic emphasized one in particular: for landowners dipping their toes into fuel reduction for the first time, keep the project “simple and realistic.”

In this forest restoration treatment, fuels are piled and will be burned later in the season. Photo by Brita Goldstein
And while even smaller projects could be more expensive this year due to higher costs for gas, equipment and supplies, she said that now is still “a great time to plan,” as fuel-reduction projects can take months to develop and execute.

In the short-term, however, Valachovic stressed that the extremely dry conditions across the state make it imperative for Californians to harden their homes, manage the fuels (i.e., landscape plants, stored wood, tall grass, etc.) immediately adjacent to their homes, and devise and review family emergency plans; see UC ANR's Wildfire Preparation page for detailed information and resources.

“There are a lot of immediate actions that people can be doing this year to help mitigate their wildfire risks and prepare for the unexpected,” she said.

In addition to Valachovic, co-authors of “Planning and Permitting Forest Fuel-Reduction Projects on Private Lands in California” are Jared Gerstein of BBW Associates and Brita Goldstein, UCCE staff research associate in Humboldt and Del Norte counties; both are registered professional foresters.

Posted on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 at 9:03 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Previous tree mortality and density big factors in the devastating 2020 Creek Fire

For predicting fire severity, dead biomass and live tree density were the two most important variables, the study found. Photo by Scott Stephens

Wildfires burning in western U.S. forests have increased in size and severity since the late 20th century, with a number of recent fires exhibiting characteristics that match the criteria for mass fires – or fires that burn with high intensity over large continuous areas for long durations of time.

Operational fire behavior models, commonly used by federal and state fire suppression agencies to predict how wildfires will behave, cannot predict mass fire behavior, largely because they do not include the important combustion and fire-atmosphere interactions. The Creek Fire, which exhibited mass fire behavior when it burned through the southern Sierra Nevada in 2020, was analyzed to better understand the mechanisms and forest conditions that contribute to devastating wildfires.

Scott Stephens, Alexis Bernal and Brandon Collins in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management at University of California, Berkeley, along with other colleagues used both ground-based and remotely sensed data to analyze behavior patterns of the 2020 Creek Fire to determine which variables were important in predicting fire severity. 

Findings indicated that dead biomass and live tree density were the two most important variables – more so than treatment history (i.e. timber harvesting, fire hazard reduction treatments, etc.), fire history or topography. Areas with the highest amounts of dead biomass and live tree densities were also positively related to high-severity fire patch size — indicating that large homogenous swaths of these types of conditions resulted in adverse, landscape-scale fire effects.

“Forest restoration must be increased greatly in California forests, the Creek Fire shows us what will happen if we don't move decisively ” said Stephens, lead author on the work, which is published in a new paper in the journal Forest Ecology and Management.

Additional analysis revealed that although the first two days of the Creek Fire were abnormally hot and dry, weather during the days of the greatest fire growth was largely within the normal range for the time of year (late summer).  The spatial distribution of fire intensity during those days, however, revealed some notable patterns, with the concentration of heat from the fire being in the opposite location of where it would be expected.  Specifically, on the day of the largest fire growth (Sept. 6), not only was the greatest heat concentrated away from the fire perimeter (or “flaming front,” which is the expected location for heat concentration), but a significant amount of heat was still being generated within the previous day's fire perimeter. This finding is critical to better understanding how traditional fire behavior models may or may not accurately predict fire behavior in forests that have large, contiguous areas of dead trees and high live tree density – an increasingly common forest fuel condition in Sierra Nevada forests.

The findings of this study have important implications for forest managers, as they indicate that in certain forest structures (i.e. those with large, homogenous swaths of dead biomass or high densities of live trees) conventional fire models may dramatically underpredict the spread rate and area burned because these models do not correctly capture the physics driving the fire.

The Creek Fire is one of a number of fires that shows how vulnerable forests are to current frequent-fire forest conditions, suffering high tree mortality and offering fuel conditions capable of generating mass fires from which future forest recovery is questionable because of type conversion and probable reoccurring high severity fire.

The study, titled “Mass Fire Behavior Created by Extensive Tree Mortality and High Density Not Predicted by Operational Fire Behavior Models in the Southern Sierra Nevada,” was published online on May 16 in the journal Forest Ecology and Management.

The authors of the paper are:

  • Scott Stephens, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Alexis Bernal, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Brandon Collins, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management and Center for Fire Research and Outreach, University of California, Berkeley.
  • Mark Finney, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station.
  • Chris Lautenberger, Reax Engineering.
Posted on Monday, May 23, 2022 at 2:35 PM
  • Author: Rachelle Hedges, Project and Policy Analyst for Berkeley Forests
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Briggs Hall Showcases Forest, Medical and Agricultural Entomology

If a room could beam, Room 122 of Briggs Hall certainly beamed on Saturday, April 23 during the 108th annual UC Davis Picnic Day. The UC Davis...

The crowd flows into 122 Briggs Hall in the early morning of April 23, UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crowd flows into 122 Briggs Hall in the early morning of April 23, UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crowd flows into 122 Briggs Hall in the early morning of April 23, UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student and forest entomologist Crystal Homicz answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student and forest entomologist Crystal Homicz answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student and forest entomologist Crystal Homicz answers questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Robert
Forensic entomologist Robert "Dr. Bob" Kimsey talks about the importance of forensic entomology. He is the faculty coordinator of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Picnic Day activities. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Robert "Dr. Bob" Kimsey talks about the importance of forensic entomology. He is the faculty coordinator of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's Picnic Day activities. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jars in front of forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey contain maggot specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jars in front of forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey contain maggot specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jars in front of forensic entomologist Robert Kimsey contain maggot specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ant posters from the Phil Ward lab drew the attention of these visitors. (Photo by Danielle Rutkowski)
Ant posters from the Phil Ward lab drew the attention of these visitors. (Photo by Danielle Rutkowski)

Ant posters from the Phil Ward lab drew the attention of these visitors. (Photo by Danielle Rutkowski)

A huge sculpture of a praying mantis occupied part of 122 Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A huge sculpture of a praying mantis occupied part of 122 Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A huge sculpture of a praying mantis occupied part of 122 Briggs Hall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Addie Abrams of the agricultural entomology laboratory of Ian Grettenberger fields questions from the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral student Addie Abrams of the agricultural entomology laboratory of Ian Grettenberger fields questions from the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral student Addie Abrams of the agricultural entomology laboratory of Ian Grettenberger fields questions from the crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All the insects fascinated   Connor Lemcke, 3, of Davis.
All the insects fascinated Connor Lemcke, 3, of Davis. "He loves bugs," said his mother, Coreen Lemke, a UC Davis alumna. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All the insects fascinated Connor Lemcke, 3, of Davis. "He loves bugs," said his mother, Coreen Lemke, a UC Davis alumna. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cooperative Extension specialist and agricultural entomologist Ian Grettenberg (far left) responds to questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cooperative Extension specialist and agricultural entomologist Ian Grettenberg (far left) responds to questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cooperative Extension specialist and agricultural entomologist Ian Grettenberg (far left) responds to questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2022 at 4:50 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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