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Posts Tagged: Apis mellifera

The Bee and the Butterfly

The bee and the butterfly.   Or, Apis mellifera and Colias eurytheme.   One's a beneficial insect. That would...

A sulphur butterfly, Colias eurytheme, and a honey bee, Apis mellifera, meet on lavender. The butterfly is a male, as identified by Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sulphur butterfly, Colias eurytheme, and a honey bee, Apis mellifera, meet on lavender. The butterfly is a male, as identified by Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sulphur butterfly, Colias eurytheme, and a honey bee, Apis mellifera, meet on lavender. The butterfly is a male, as identified by Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, bee, I was here first! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, bee, I was here first! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, bee, I was here first! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, butterfly! I was here second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, butterfly! I was here second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, butterfly! I was here second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male butterfly, leery of the encroaching bee, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male butterfly, leery of the encroaching bee, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male butterfly, leery of the encroaching bee, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 1, 2022 at 4:10 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Western Honey Bee Origin: It's in the Genes

Scientists and honey bee enthusiasts have been debating the origin of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) for centuries. We know that...

Inside the hive: a queen bee and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Inside the hive: a queen bee and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Inside the hive: a queen bee and worker bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 14, 2021 at 4:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Close Encounter of a Long-Horned Bee and a Honey Bee

So, here you are, a honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. All's right with the world, at least in your world....

A male long-horned bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. This was shot with a shutter speed set at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male long-horned bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. This was shot with a shutter speed set at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male long-horned bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. This was shot with a shutter speed set at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee lifts a foreleg in defense as the long-horned bee takes flight. Image shot at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee lifts a foreleg in defense as the long-horned bee takes flight. Image shot at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee lifts a foreleg in defense as the long-horned bee takes flight. Image shot at 1/5000 of a second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 8, 2021 at 2:30 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Bee and the Lygus Bug

Ever seen a beneficial insect and a pest sharing the same blossom? At a recent visit to the UC Davis Ecological Garden at the Student Farm, we...

A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a lygus bug sharing a batchelor button in the UC Davis Ecological Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee edges closer to the lygus bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The insects meet, the honey bee, the beneficial insect, and the lygus bug, the pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 29, 2021 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

A Touch of Red on Earth Day

It's Earth Day, an event we celebrate every April 22 to demonstrate support for environmental protections on our troubled planet. This year's...

A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee touches down on a rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This plant yield red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)
A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A honey bee rolling around in rock purslane on Earth Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee packing red pollen from the rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving a rock purslane and heading off to another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 22, 2021 at 2:48 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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