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Posts Tagged: fly

UC Davis Picnic Day: The Art of Fly-Tying

Ever seen an angler tie a fly? You will if you visit Briggs Hall during the 110th annual UC Davis Picnic Day on Saturday, April 20. "The Art of Fly...

A display by the Fly Fishers of Davis at a recent UC Davis Picnic Day. The Fly Fishers are an integral part of the insect activities at Briggs Hall, home of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A display by the Fly Fishers of Davis at a recent UC Davis Picnic Day. The Fly Fishers are an integral part of the insect activities at Briggs Hall, home of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A display by the Fly Fishers of Davis at a recent UC Davis Picnic Day. The Fly Fishers are an integral part of the insect activities at Briggs Hall, home of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The art of tying a fly by the Fly Fishers of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The art of tying a fly by the Fly Fishers of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The art of tying a fly by the Fly Fishers of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At the end of a mini-session with Paul Berliner (right) of the Fly Fishers of Davis, it's family photo time. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
At the end of a mini-session with Paul Berliner (right) of the Fly Fishers of Davis, it's family photo time. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At the end of a mini-session with Paul Berliner (right) of the Fly Fishers of Davis, it's family photo time. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 17, 2024 at 2:04 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Lagoon Fly: Seeing Spots

Ever seen a lagoon fly?  It's a syrphid fly, Eristalinus aeneus, distinguished by small black spots patterning its...

The lagoon fly is a syrphid fly, Eristalinus aeneus. This one is foraging on Virginia stock (Malcolmia maritima), in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).
The lagoon fly is a syrphid fly, Eristalinus aeneus. This one is foraging on Virginia stock (Malcolmia maritima), in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).

The lagoon fly is a syrphid fly, Eristalinus aeneus. This one is foraging on Virginia stock (Malcolmia maritima), in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).

Posted on Wednesday, March 27, 2024 at 2:14 PM

Presenting: A Butterfly and a Fly

A gray butterfly and a fruit fly... Each has "fly" in its name but one is a member of the order Lepidoptera and the other,...

A fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, peers up at a gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, in a bed of Coreopsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, peers up at a gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, in a bed of Coreopsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, peers up at a gray hairstreak butterfly, Strymon melinus, in a bed of Coreopsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Closeup of a  fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, an organism commonly known as a
Closeup of a fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, an organism commonly known as a "sunflower seed maggot." Green is reflected in its eyes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Closeup of a fruit fly, Neotephritis finalis, an organism commonly known as a "sunflower seed maggot." Green is reflected in its eyes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 25, 2024 at 2:23 PM

'How Flies Control How They Walk by Knowing When and How to Stop'

What a catchy title for a seminar: "How Flies Control How They Walk by Knowing When and How to Stop." Meet Salil Bidaye, Research Group Leader,...

Pink Sugar and a Syrphid

Who doesn't like "Pink Sugar?" No, not the sweetener. The brilliantly colored Arctotis "Pink Sugar," also known as a pink African...

A syrphid fly forages on an Arctotis
A syrphid fly forages on an Arctotis "Pink Sugar" African daisy in Vacaville. Note the raindrops on the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly forages on an Arctotis "Pink Sugar" African daisy in Vacaville. Note the raindrops on the blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 15, 2024 at 5:46 PM
Tags: Arctotis (0), honorary bee (0), Pink Sugar (0), Syrphid Fly (0)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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