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Posts Tagged: bumble bees

Danielle Rutkowski: Symbiotic Fungi Associated with Social Bees

If you've been following the outstanding academic accomplishments of UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski, you know that she researches the...

UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski doing field work.
UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski doing field work.

UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski doing field work.

UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski talks to visitors at the Rachel Vannette lab display in Briggs Hall during the 2024 UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski talks to visitors at the Rachel Vannette lab display in Briggs Hall during the 2024 UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski talks to visitors at the Rachel Vannette lab display in Briggs Hall during the 2024 UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 16, 2024 at 4:43 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

When Being Framed Is a Great Thing!

Usually when you say "I was framed," it's because someone has accused you of something you didn't do. With the Entomological Society of America...

UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski won an Entomological Society of America President's Prize for the second consecutive year. (Photo courtesy of ESA)
UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski won an Entomological Society of America President's Prize for the second consecutive year. (Photo courtesy of ESA)

UC Davis entomology doctoral candidate Danielle Rutkowski won an Entomological Society of America President's Prize for the second consecutive year. (Photo courtesy of ESA)

UC Davis doctoral candidate Zachary Griebenow won a President's Prize at the 2022 Entomological Society of America  meeting. (Photo Courtesy of ESA)
UC Davis doctoral candidate Zachary Griebenow won a President's Prize at the 2022 Entomological Society of America meeting. (Photo Courtesy of ESA)

UC Davis doctoral candidate Zachary Griebenow won a President's Prize at the 2022 Entomological Society of America meeting. (Photo Courtesy of ESA)

A large crowd listened to UC Davis doctoral candidate discuss her research, “The Mechanism Behind Beneficial Effects of Bee-Associated Fungi on Bumble Bee Health.
A large crowd listened to UC Davis doctoral candidate discuss her research, “The Mechanism Behind Beneficial Effects of Bee-Associated Fungi on Bumble Bee Health." (Photo courtesy of ESA)

A large crowd listened to UC Davis doctoral candidate discuss her research, “The Mechanism Behind Beneficial Effects of Bee-Associated Fungi on Bumble Bee Health." (Photo courtesy of ESA)

Posted on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 at 4:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Saving California's Bumble Bees: Become a Citizen Scientist

The late Robbin Thorp, UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, would have been proud of the California Bumble Bee...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on foxgloves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on foxgloves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on foxgloves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male  black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus crotchii foraging in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. It has been named an endangered species due to the impacts of pesticides, climate change, and human development. (Photo by Allan Jones)
Bombus crotchii foraging in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. It has been named an endangered species due to the impacts of pesticides, climate change, and human development. (Photo by Allan Jones)

Bombus crotchii foraging in the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden. It has been named an endangered species due to the impacts of pesticides, climate change, and human development. (Photo by Allan Jones)

Posted on Wednesday, May 25, 2022 at 2:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Bumble Bees at Bodega Bay: Seeing Double

What's better than seeing a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an neon pink ice plant at Bodega Bay? Seeing two bumble...

A lone yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an ice plant blossom at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lone yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an ice plant blossom at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lone yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an ice plant blossom at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Hey, move over! I want to forage here, too." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, on one neon ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Hey, move over! I want to forage here, too." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, on one neon ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Let's share this flower." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Let's share this flower." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on an ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Hey, you're getting too close to me. I was here first." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the same ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Hey, you're getting too close to me. I was here first." Two bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the same ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Ah, all mine again!" A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, rolling in the pollen of a neon ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Ah, all mine again!" A bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, rolling in the pollen of a neon ice plant blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 16, 2022 at 4:51 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Bumble Bee Ballet

Ever watched a bumble bee ballet? Bumble bees may look clumsy in flight, but they get the job done. We recently marveled at the yellow-faced bumble...

A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bees, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Phacelia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Packing red pollen, this yellow-faced bumble bee targets another  Phacelia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Packing red pollen, this yellow-faced bumble bee targets another Phacelia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Packing red pollen, this yellow-faced bumble bee targets another Phacelia blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Buzzing and never missing a beat, this bumble bee is a study in movement. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Buzzing and never missing a beat, this bumble bee is a study in movement. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Buzzing and never missing a beat, this bumble bee is a study in movement. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee ballet ends where another one begins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee ballet ends where another one begins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee ballet ends where another one begins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 1, 2022 at 3:48 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Yard & Garden

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