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Posts Tagged: pesticide

Pesticide Research: Paper of the Month

Trace detection of such organophosphates as triazophos, parathion, and chlorpyrifos is “extremely important for various reasons, including food...

Maojun Jin served as a visiting scholar in the Bruce Hammock lab from September 2019 to September 2020. Here he is with his family at UC Davis.
Maojun Jin served as a visiting scholar in the Bruce Hammock lab from September 2019 to September 2020. Here he is with his family at UC Davis.

Maojun Jin served as a visiting scholar in the Bruce Hammock lab from September 2019 to September 2020. Here he is with his family at UC Davis.

Doctoral student Yuanshang Wang of the Majojun Jin lab is the first author of the paper.
Doctoral student Yuanshang Wang of the Majojun Jin lab is the first author of the paper.

Doctoral student Yuanshang Wang of the Majojun Jin lab is the first author of the paper.

Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2023 at 3:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Pest Management

UCCE researchers target sugar-feeding ants, a key to controlling citrus pests, disease

David Haviland sharing his research at the Argentine Ant and Citrus Pest Management Field Day in Redlands in October 2022. All photos by Saoimanu Sope.

Sugar-feeding ants protect pests that infect trees and damage the fruit they bear. Insecticides are often a go-to solution, but may kill beneficial insects in the process, too. Thankfully, Mark Hoddle, University of California Cooperative Extension entomologist and biological control specialist at UC Riverside, together with UCR colleagues in chemical engineering, developed a biodegradable hydrogel baiting system that targets ant populations, which protect sap-sucking pests from their natural enemies. Control of ants allows beneficial parasitoids and predators to greatly reduce pest populations.

Deciding to expand Hoddle's research was a “no-brainer” according to David Haviland, UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor in Kern County.

Haviland is investigating active ingredients that can be effectively used in hydrogel baiting systems. His research builds on Hoddle's use of alginate gels, also known as water beads, soaked in sugar water to control Argentine ants.

“What we're doing in California can benefit places like Florida, Texas, Mexico and beyond,” Haviland said.

A display of Argentine ants at the Argentine Ant and Citrus Pest Management Field Day in Redlands in October 2022.
Sugar-feeding ants are a universal problem as they interfere with biocontrol processes and promote diseases like huanglongbing, or citrus greening, because there are more vectors to spread disease-causing organisms between trees.

The Hoddle lab conducted two years of orchard research showing that when ants are controlled, the amount of citrus flush infested with Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), a mottled brown insect that vectors the pathogen causing citrus greening, decreases by 75%. Citrus flush refers to newly developed leaves.

“But benefits are not restricted to just ACP with Argentine ant control, as natural enemies destroy colonies of other sap-sucking pests too,” said Hoddle. “For example, citrus mealybug infestations on leaves were completely eliminated by natural enemies, 100% control, while densities of fruit infested by mealybugs were reduced by 50%.” 

The Hoddle lab's success inspired Haviland to consider how this approach will fare in different regions of the state where there are different crops, different pests and different ant species. 

Haviland has worked for many years on solid baits that are effective and affordable for ants that feed primarily on protein, like fire ants in almonds, but successful control measures for sugar-feeding ants that drink their food have been elusive.

“Therefore, we're using hydrogels to essentially turn a liquid bait into a solid, making it effective and commercially adoptable,” Haviland said. He and his team are assessing whether active ingredients that undoubtedly work against ants, like thiamethoxam, maintain their effects in a hydrogel system.

Unlike Hoddle's biodegradable alginate gels, Haviland is relying on acrylamide gels that are similar to the absorbing material you would find in a diaper. These gels are not organic, but are currently accessible on a commercial scale, and have been shown to be effective in wine grapes on the North Coast by a Cooperative Extension advisor in Napa County, Monica Cooper. Haviland's current research efforts are focused on citrus, table grapes and wine grapes in the San Joaquin Valley, and on lemons on the coast.

Hoddle's hydrogel baiting system uses alginate gels.
Haviland is experimenting with acrylamide gels.

The primary challenge now is navigating pesticide regulations and registration.

“This is cutting-edge research,” Haviland said, and manufacturer labels for the products being used need to be updated to include hydrogels as an approved use. This process takes time. Additionally, adding new product uses needs to make economic sense for the manufacturer.

Hoddle and Haviland's research can provide data for adding these methods to the product labels.

“If we can show that this tech works against lots of pests, lots of ant species, in lots of different crops across California, hopefully we'll achieve a critical mass of benefits that motivates product manufacturers to make modifications to their labels,” said Haviland.

Haviland is hopeful about the process, and said he believes that UC ANR is in a prime position to lead innovation for an issue that requires collaboration among specialists, advisors and the industry.

Posted on Monday, January 9, 2023 at 1:54 PM
Tags: ants (46), Argentine (1), bait (1), biocontrol (6), citrus (27), Haviland (1), Hoddle (1), hydrogel (1), innovation (2), Kern (1), pest (6), pesticide (1), Riverside (2), sugar (3)
Focus Area Tags: Innovation, Pest Management

Congrats to Tom Sparks, Recipient of ESA's Nan-Yao Su Award

Congrats to biological chemist and green pesticide developer Thomas “Tom” Sparks, winner of the  Entomological Association of...

Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2021 at 3:21 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Looking to hire a maintenance gardener? Make sure they are DPR certified

Memorial Day Weekend has just passed, bringing with it the unofficial start of summer. The warm weather we've recently experienced following a rich rainy season is the perfect combination for the luscious growth we see in lawns and landscapes.

Business picks up this time of year for the many maintenance gardeners who are hired to mow lawns, clean up landscapes, or get rid of unwanted insects, diseases, or weeds. What many people may not realize is that maintenance gardeners who apply pesticides as part of their services must be certified by the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR). Even if pesticides are not used often, such as a single herbicide application, a Qualified Applicator Certificate in the Maintenance Gardener Category Q (QAC-Q) is required. This certification allows maintenance gardeners to legally apply general use pesticides as part of their services.

Maintenance gardeners who apply pesticides must be certified by DPR. (Photo: Jack Kelly Clark)

According to DPR, approximately two-thirds of pesticide exposure-related illnesses reported between 2005 and 2014 in California came from urban settings such as parks, gardens, schools and homes. Maintenance gardeners with a QAC-Q are qualified to follow California laws and regulations that help them to use, transport, store and dispose of pesticides safely in order to avoid human injury and contamination of the environment. They are also trained in pest identification and alternative methods to managing pests without the use of pesticides.

If you are a homeowner and use maintenance gardener services or are looking to hire, be sure to use one that is certified by DPR to ensure that they have the qualifications to follow the law and apply pesticides safely around your home. View the DPR Maintenance Gardener leaflet for homeowners and consumers (PDF) for more information on what you can do.

If you are a maintenance gardener and not yet certified, visit the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM) website for resources to help you. The exam preparation page lists several materials such as a study guide available for purchase as well as free online modules and practice exam questions, available in both English and Spanish.

Those who already hold a QAC-Q must renew it by taking eight hours of DPR-approved continuing education (CE) courses every two years, with at least two hours in the laws and regulations category. Find approved online courses on the UCIPM training page.

For more information about the Qualified Applicator Certificate in the Maintenance Gardener Category, check out the DPR website and DPR's quick reference pocket guide (PDF).

Maintenance gardeners are qualified to follow CA laws and regulations, such as reading and following pesticide label directions. (Photo: Michael Poe)
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2017 at 9:13 AM
Tags: gardener (0), pesticide use (0)

Pretty in Pink--And in Other Colors, Too!

They're pretty in pink. Well, not just pink. All other colors, too.  It's National Honey Bee Day on Saturday, Aug. 20. That's when we...

A honey bee heads toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads toward rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging on zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee foraging on zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging on zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This bee took a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This bee took a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This bee took a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2016 at 5:13 PM

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