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Posts Tagged: Eric Mussen

Revisiting 'The 13 Bugs of Christmas'

Back in 2010, UC Cooperative Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen (1944-2022) of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, and...

A golden honey bee, a Cordovan, nectaring in a Vacaville, Calif., garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A golden honey bee, a Cordovan, nectaring in a Vacaville, Calif., garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A golden honey bee, a Cordovan, nectaring in a Vacaville, Calif., garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A varroa mite attached to a foraging bee in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A varroa mite attached to a foraging bee in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A varroa mite attached to a foraging bee in a Vacaville, Calif. garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, December 22, 2023 at 10:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources

Honey Bee Larvae: Weigh to Go!

It's a week before Christmas and it's not just the geese that are getting fat. If you're thinking that the bathroom scale and you are not good...

Queen bee laying an egg. A honey bee egg weighs about 0.1 mg, according to the late Extension apiculturist emeritus Eric Mussen, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Queen bee laying an egg. A honey bee egg weighs about 0.1 mg, according to the late Extension apiculturist emeritus Eric Mussen, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Queen bee laying an egg. A honey bee egg weighs about 0.1 mg, according to the late Extension apiculturist emeritus Eric Mussen, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Over the next six days, a tiny egg will soar to 120 mg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Over the next six days, a tiny egg will soar to 120 mg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Over the next six days, a tiny egg will soar to 120 mg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee larvae grow fast. Here a bee, next to larvae, is ready to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee larvae grow fast. Here a bee, next to larvae, is ready to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee larvae grow fast. Here a bee, next to larvae, is ready to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly emerged honey bee. It weighs about 1000 times the weight of a one-day-old bee larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Newly emerged honey bee. It weighs about 1000 times the weight of a one-day-old bee larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Newly emerged honey bee. It weighs about 1000 times the weight of a one-day-old bee larva. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 19, 2023 at 5:03 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources

Kim Flottum: Friend of Beekeepers and Bees

We are saddened to hear of the death of Peter "Kim" Flottum, longtime editor of Bee Culture magazine, a friend of the nation's beekeepers and...

UC Davis emeritus professor Norm Gary (far right) working with Kim Flottum (seated) on a television project in 2010 at UC Davis. In back is a member of the TV crew. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis emeritus professor Norm Gary (far right) working with Kim Flottum (seated) on a television project in 2010 at UC Davis. In back is a member of the TV crew. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis emeritus professor Norm Gary (far right) working with Kim Flottum (seated) on a television project in 2010 at UC Davis. In back is a member of the TV crew. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In 2010, Kim Flottum, then editor of Bee Culture, stands by a cluster of bees, ready for bee wrangling by his friend Norm Gary, UC Davis emeritus professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In 2010, Kim Flottum, then editor of Bee Culture, stands by a cluster of bees, ready for bee wrangling by his friend Norm Gary, UC Davis emeritus professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In 2010, Kim Flottum, then editor of Bee Culture, stands by a cluster of bees, ready for bee wrangling by his friend Norm Gary, UC Davis emeritus professor of entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, December 11, 2023 at 2:23 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Bee-ing Thankful for Honey Bees

Let's put the "thanks" in THANKSgiving by bee-ing thankful for the honey bee, Apis mellifera... If your table includes pumpkin, cranberries,...

The squash bee,  Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thank a bee for the squash! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thank a bee for the squash! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thank a bee for the squash! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee pollinating a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee pollinating a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee pollinating a pomegranate blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thank a bee for the pomegranate! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thank a bee for the pomegranate! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thank a bee for the pomegranate! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2023 at 12:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Bee Bearding in California's Excessive Heat

Have you read the excessive heat warnings and the guidelines to prevent heat illnesses as triple-digit temperatures hold us hostage in Yolo and...

As temperatures soar, feral honey bees engage in bearding to reduce the heat load inside.  These bees are in a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As temperatures soar, feral honey bees engage in bearding to reduce the heat load inside. These bees are in a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As temperatures soar, feral honey bees engage in bearding to reduce the heat load inside. These bees are in a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees buzz in and out of their colony inside a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. Bee bearding helps reduce the heat load inside. Honey bee colonies require a temperature of 94 degrees for the developing brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees buzz in and out of their colony inside a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. Bee bearding helps reduce the heat load inside. Honey bee colonies require a temperature of 94 degrees for the developing brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees buzz in and out of their colony inside a sycamore tree on the UC Davis campus. Bee bearding helps reduce the heat load inside. Honey bee colonies require a temperature of 94 degrees for the developing brood. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 17, 2023 at 3:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

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