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Posts Tagged: spider

A Treat for the UC Davis Biodiversity Museum Day

Trick or treat? Treat, please, says this jumping spider. It's time to jump in to help the 13th annual UC Davis Biodiversity Museum...

Posted on Friday, October 27, 2023 at 1:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Family, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Decisions, Decisions! The Katydid or the Bee?

So here's this crab spider stalking a katydid nymph foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. Dinner awaits! Suddenly a native...

A crab spider is about to nail a katydid nymph when a longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, appears on the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider is about to nail a katydid nymph when a longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, appears on the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider is about to nail a katydid nymph when a longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, appears on the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, continues to forage under the watchful eye of the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, continues to forage under the watchful eye of the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, continues to forage under the watchful eye of the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee turns aways from the crab spider, still unaware of the danger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The longhorned bee turns aways from the crab spider, still unaware of the danger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee turns aways from the crab spider, still unaware of the danger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider hauls the struggling katydid nymph over the side of the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider hauls the struggling katydid nymph over the side of the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider hauls the struggling katydid nymph over the side of the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 12, 2023 at 9:04 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

UC Davis Spider Experts Analyze Genetics of Newly Described Spider That Engages in Lekking Behavior

Have you heard about the newly described kite spider species in Madagascar that is drawing worldwide attention for its lekking behavior? In...

Colonial Isoxya manangona n. sp. from Andasibe, Madagascar. (a) A part of a colony with 79 spiders in 41 webs (image shows 23 webs). (b) A detail from another colony where females are in their individual webs (image shows 14 of the 16 webs in the colony) while males hang on line in between webs (image shows 12 males). (c) A detail of another colony showing male leks. These males showed no overt intrasexual aggression that would be typical of solitary spiders. (Insect Systematics and Diversity)
Colonial Isoxya manangona n. sp. from Andasibe, Madagascar. (a) A part of a colony with 79 spiders in 41 webs (image shows 23 webs). (b) A detail from another colony where females are in their individual webs (image shows 14 of the 16 webs in the colony) while males hang on line in between webs (image shows 12 males). (c) A detail of another colony showing male leks. These males showed no overt intrasexual aggression that would be typical of solitary spiders. (Insect Systematics and Diversity)

Colonial Isoxya manangona n. sp. from Andasibe, Madagascar. (a) A part of a colony with 79 spiders in 41 webs (image shows 23 webs). (b) A detail from another colony where females are in their individual webs (image shows 14 of the 16 webs in the colony) while males hang on line in between webs (image shows 12 males). (c) A detail of another colony showing male leks. These males showed no overt intrasexual aggression that would be typical of solitary spiders. (Insect Systematics and Diversity)

Posted on Thursday, April 6, 2023 at 6:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Spider, the Syrphid and the Zinnia

What are you having for Thanksgiving? Turkey and all the trimmings? Well, this little jumping spider had his sights set on ambushing a...

A syrphid fly touches down on a zinnia, unaware of a stalking jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly touches down on a zinnia, unaware of a stalking jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly touches down on a zinnia, unaware of a stalking jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Closer and closer comes the jumping spider. The syrphid fly does not see him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Closer and closer comes the jumping spider. The syrphid fly does not see him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Closer and closer comes the jumping spider. The syrphid fly does not see him. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly slurps the nectar, unaware she is being watched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The syrphid fly slurps the nectar, unaware she is being watched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The syrphid fly slurps the nectar, unaware she is being watched. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...the jumping spider starts his jump to nail the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready, set...the jumping spider starts his jump to nail the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready, set...the jumping spider starts his jump to nail the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! Hey, where'd you go? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Missed! Hey, where'd you go? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! Hey, where'd you go? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 at 8:06 AM
Tags: ambush (0), jumping spider (0), meal (0), syrphid fly (0), Thanksgiving (0), zinnia (0)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Got Legs? Check Out Bohart Museum's Trapdoor Spider T-Shirt

Everyone's an arachnologist on Halloween! Ironically, some folks proclaim their hatred or disgust for all things spiders throughout the year, but...

Female Cryptocteniza kawtak discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. This is a new genus of trapdoor spider. (Photo by Jason Bond)
Female Cryptocteniza kawtak discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. This is a new genus of trapdoor spider. (Photo by Jason Bond)

Female Cryptocteniza kawtak discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. This is a new genus of trapdoor spider. (Photo by Jason Bond)

Posted on Monday, October 31, 2022 at 2:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Family, Innovation, Natural Resources

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