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Posts Tagged: caterpillars

Alfalfa YouTube Finalist

YouTube video showing how to identify parasitized caterpillars in alfalfa fields

We are excited to announce that our Alfalfa IPM YouTube video titled, “Identification of parasitized alfalfa caterpillars and armyworms”,...

YouTube video showing how to identify parasitized caterpillars in alfalfa fields
YouTube video showing how to identify parasitized caterpillars in alfalfa fields

Posted on Friday, November 20, 2015 at 4:20 PM
Tags: Alfalfa (50), biocontrol (3), caterpillars (12), natural enemies (1)

Thank You, Mrs. Monarch!

A monarch caterpillar chowing down milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thank you, Mrs. Monarch. Thank you for laying your eggs on our newly planted narrowleaf milkweed. We planted the narrowleafed milkweed last...

A monarch caterpillar chowing down milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch caterpillar chowing down milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch caterpillar chowing down milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The long and short of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The long and short of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The long and short of it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An adult monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spreading his wings--a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Spreading his wings--a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spreading his wings--a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 1, 2015 at 5:27 PM

Why Influx of Caterpillars Linked to Hawks

Three's company! Three juvenile Cooper's hawks, as identified by Andrew Engilis, Jr. curator of the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology,cooling off in an urban birdbath in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe."--John Muir, My First Summer in the Sierra Muir...

Three's company! Three juvenile Cooper's hawks, as identified by Andrew Engilis, Jr. curator of the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology,cooling off in an urban birdbath in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Three's company! Three juvenile Cooper's hawks, as identified by Andrew Engilis, Jr. curator of the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology,cooling off in an urban birdbath in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three's company! Three juvenile Cooper's hawks, as identified by Andrew Engilis, Jr. curator of the UC Davis Museum of Wildlife and Fish Biology,cooling off in an urban birdbath in Vacaville. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary gets ready to lay an egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary gets ready to lay an egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary gets ready to lay an egg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars defoliating the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars defoliating the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars defoliating the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 24, 2015 at 5:13 PM

From a Caterpillar to a Butterfly; Don't Eat 'em--Here's Why

The Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar is black with red spines. This one was displayed at the UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors to the UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program (UC IPM) display in front of Briggs Hall at the 101st annual Picnic Day last Saturday...

The Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar is black with red spines. This one was displayed at the UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar is black with red spines. This one was displayed at the UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar is black with red spines. This one was displayed at the UC Davis Picnic Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The human touch: young fingers touch the Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The human touch: young fingers touch the Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The human touch: young fingers touch the Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Jupiter's Beard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An adult Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Jupiter's Beard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult Pipevine Swallowtail nectaring on Jupiter's Beard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bird's eye view of the UC IPM display in front of Briggs Hall during the 101st annual campuswide Picnic Day. Staffing the tables are Extension entomologist specialist emeritus Mary Lou Flint (left), former associate director for urban and community IPM and Karey Windbiel-Rojas who replaced Flint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bird's eye view of the UC IPM display in front of Briggs Hall during the 101st annual campuswide Picnic Day. Staffing the tables are Extension entomologist specialist emeritus Mary Lou Flint (left), former associate director for urban and community IPM and Karey Windbiel-Rojas who replaced Flint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bird's eye view of the UC IPM display in front of Briggs Hall during the 101st annual campuswide Picnic Day. Staffing the tables are Extension entomologist specialist emeritus Mary Lou Flint (left), former associate director for urban and community IPM and Karey Windbiel-Rojas who replaced Flint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 6:17 PM

A Lady Beetle and Gulf Fritillary Caterpillars

Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new

What's this?   A lady beetle, aka ladybug, sharing stories with Gulf Fritillary caterpillars?   Well, not likely.   The lady...

Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new
Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new "friends"--Gulf Fritillary caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lady beetle, aka ladybug, with its new "friends"--Gulf Fritillary caterpillars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars move around the lady beetle, aka ladybug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A touching moment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary caterpillars will grow up to look like this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 29, 2014 at 4:29 PM

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