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Posts Tagged: wasps

Bohart Museum Virtual Open House: Got a Question About Wasps?

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

Do you have a question about wasps? Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and UC Davis professor of...

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)
This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

This is the Asian giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia, that was detected and destroyed on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in September 2019. (Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Agriculture)

This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity.  It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.
This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity. It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.

This is an illustration that appears in the current edition of the journal Insect Systematics and Diversity. It is the work of Allan Smith-Pardo of USDA.

Posted on Thursday, May 14, 2020 at 5:07 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

Parasitoid Palooza at Bohart Museum Open House

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mark your calendars for a "parade of parasitoids!" The Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis, is sponsoring its annual...

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just in time for Halloween! The orange and black Harlequin beetles will be displayed at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Oct. 19. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 11, 2019 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Family, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Scientists Reveal New Method to Characterize Physiological Responses to Parasitism

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

Have you ever seen a wasp oviposit or lay its eggs inside a caterpillar? Or the egg of a moth? it's not always easy to tell what's going on without...

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)
A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

Posted on Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 6:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

These European Paper Wasps Didn't Get the Memo

A sign on a UC Davis recycling bin clearly says

They didn't get the memo. A sign on a recycling bin near the Mann Laboratory at the University of California, Davis, clearly reads "Bottles and Cans...

A sign on a UC Davis recycling bin clearly says
A sign on a UC Davis recycling bin clearly says "Bottles and Cans Only." It says nothing about wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sign on a UC Davis recycling bin clearly says "Bottles and Cans Only." It says nothing about wasps. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the European paper wasps building their nest beneath the overhanging lid of a recycling bin. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the European paper wasps building their nest beneath the overhanging lid of a recycling bin. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the European paper wasps building their nest beneath the overhanging lid of a recycling bin. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps even built a nest in a donation box in the Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University.
European paper wasps even built a nest in a donation box in the Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University. "These ladies had expensive taste," quipped associate professor Amy Toth, who reseachers European paper wasps. (Photo by Amy Merritt, Reiman Gardens)

European paper wasps even built a nest in a donation box in the Reiman Gardens, Iowa State University. "These ladies had expensive taste," quipped associate professor Amy Toth, who reseachers European paper wasps. (Photo by Amy Merritt, Reiman Gardens)

Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2018 at 4:38 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Parasitoid Palooza! Or What Ate My Caterpillar or Chrysalis

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So you're trying to rear monarch butterflies. You notice an egg on your milkweed plant, and watch its life cycle from egg to caterpillar to...

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult  tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM

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