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Posts Tagged: honey bee

Not a Good Day for a Bee

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid praying mantis, Stagmomantis limbata, crawls out of a patch of African blue basil, and begins checking out the honey...

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A gravid Stagmomantis limbata eyes a honey bee nectaring on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis grips the honey bee with her spiked forelegs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As the praying mantis eats the honey bee, another honey bee comes over to investigate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soon another honey bee appears on the scene. The two bees quickly left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 2, 2020 at 1:35 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Honey Bee and the Praying Mantis

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So I'm a praying mantis and being a top-notch real estate developer, I've located the best place in the pollinator garden. I have acquired the proper...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil blossoms is unaware that on the other side, camouflaged and hidden in the shadows, is a praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, intent on gathering nectar, doesn't notice a praying mantis in her flight zone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oops, what's that blocking my path?" the bee says. "Look at those spiked forelegs. This might not end well." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee survives to visit the African blue basil patch another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Oh, well, I forgot to pray before breakfast." The praying mantis assumes its position. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2020 at 5:29 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Beauty of the Bee

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla

Have you ever pulled up a chair in your garden and watched honey bees foraging? They are so intent on their "bees-ness" that they don't know you're...

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla
A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on African blue basil in Vacaville, Calif. At right is Salvia microphylla "Hot Lips." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee, its tongue or proboscis still extended, departs from the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee pulls its proboscis back in and is leaving the African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Frozen in time--a honey bee takes flight and heads for home. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2020 at 4:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Honey Bees: Are There Pollen Specialists and Nectar Specialists?

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You often hear that foraging honey bees are either pollen specialists or nectar specialists. That is, some leave the hive to collect pollen for their...

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) has almost reaching its loading limit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 18, 2020 at 10:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Milkweed: A Honey Bee's Floral Trap

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is  the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It is not a "pretty sight," as Ernest Hemingway might have said, to see a honey bee stuck like glue--nature's "gorilla glue?"-in the reproductive...

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is  the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee stuck in milkweed pollinia. This plant is the narrowleaf milkweed,Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee struggles to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Almost free! A honey bee works to free herself from the sticky nectar trough of a milkweed plant, Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Death trap: This bee couldn't free herself from the sticky milkweed blossom of a Asclepias fascicularis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 17, 2020 at 12:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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