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Posts Tagged: innovation

Bruce Hammock: UC Davis Distinguished Professor Extraordinaire

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock

Don't let that photo fool you. Yes, that's UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "resting" in a hammock on the UC Davis...

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "rests" in a hammock on the UC Davis campus. The occasion: the Hammock lab scientists were walking across campus (before the coronoavirus pandemic precautions). (Photo by Cindy McReynolds)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock "rests" in a hammock on the UC Davis campus. The occasion: the Hammock lab scientists were walking across campus (before the coronoavirus pandemic precautions). (Photo by Cindy McReynolds)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished professor Bruce Hammock in his Briggs Hall office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 15, 2020 at 4:36 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Congrats to Antoine Abrieux, Innovator Fellow Award

This is the tiny insect--a fruit fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) that Antoine Abrieuz studies in the Joanna Chiu lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Congrats to postdoctoral researcher Antoine Abrieux of the Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of California, Davis! Abrieux,...

This is the tiny insect--a fruit fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) that Antoine Abrieuz studies in the Joanna Chiu lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the tiny insect--a fruit fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) that Antoine Abrieuz studies in the Joanna Chiu lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the tiny insect--a fruit fly known as the spotted-wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) that Antoine Abrieuz studies in the Joanna Chiu lab at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Postdoctoral researcher Antoine Abrieux of the Joanna Chiu lab is also a talented photographer and enjoys capturing images of insects, such as this lady beetle (ladybug) in flight. (Photo by Antoine Abrieux)
Postdoctoral researcher Antoine Abrieux of the Joanna Chiu lab is also a talented photographer and enjoys capturing images of insects, such as this lady beetle (ladybug) in flight. (Photo by Antoine Abrieux)

Postdoctoral researcher Antoine Abrieux of the Joanna Chiu lab is also a talented photographer and enjoys capturing images of insects, such as this lady beetle (ladybug) in flight. (Photo by Antoine Abrieux)

Posted on Wednesday, January 8, 2020 at 4:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Health, Innovation

Open Farm 2018 and UC ANR promote ag technology

A torrent of technology is flowing into the agricultural sector. To make sense of it, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources, Fresno State and West Hills Community College came together with technology vendors and growers at Open Farm 2018, held in October at UC ANR's Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Parlier.

“A lot of technology is coming out,” said Kearney director and UC Cooperative Extension agronomy specialist Jeff Dahlberg. “I need to caution you, it's not all is based on science. We are helping with testing.”

Kearney REC director Jeff Dahlberg speaks to participants at Open Farm.

Dalhberg has been working with Blue River Technologies to monitor the growth of dozens of sorghum cultivars. Throughout the growing season, Blue River flew drones over the sorghum nursery with cameras to capture their growth and development.

“We have a huge phenotypic dataset,” Dalhberg said. “It will be compared at the genetic level with plant samples and help us identify genes associated with drought tolerance.”

At Open Farm, Dahlberg's field presentation was paired with Smartfield, a company that uses fixed cameras and field sensors to gather information for “big data crunching.”

PowWow Energy, based in San Francisco with a field office at the Water, Energy and Technology (WET) Center at Fresno State, met near a well at Kearney to explain how the company can help growers with decision support tools. The company believes their technology will be useful for farmers tracking groundwater usage, data that will be key to complying with new rules associated with the Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA). SGMA, signed by Gov. Brown in 2014, gives local agencies the authority to manage groundwater in a way that achieves sustainability by 2042.

Representatives of PowWow Energy meet with Open Farm participants near a well at the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center.

UCCE agriculture mechanization specialist Ali Pourezza introduced a prototype he developed with junior specialist German Zuniga-Ramirez that he believes will make early detection of the devastating citrus disease huanglongbing as easy as taking a photo with a smartphone camera.

The idea is based on the optical characteristics of the disease in leaves. By using a polarizing light, leaves on diseased trees are immediately identified. Infected trees can then be torn out before insects have the chance to spread the disease to other trees.

Pourezza and Zuniga-Ramirez are seeking funding to take the prototype to the next level, and eventually commercialize the product.

UCCE specialist Ali Pourreza compares a citrus leaf infected with HLB with one that is not infected.

This sampling of innovations being showcased at Kearney is part of a continuing effort by UC to connect the ag community with technology developers and resources that is shepherded by a new UC ANR program called The VINE, Verde Innovation Network For Entrepreneurship. The VINE was created by UC ANR in 2017 to link entrepreneurs with mentors, advisors, collaborators, events, competitions and education.

At Open Farm 2018, UC ANR vice president Glenda Humiston was the keynote speaker. She outlined three areas where farmers, the technology sector and academia can work together to accelerate technology application in rural parts of California: improve broadband access, identify high-value uses for biomass and establish water infrastructure in rural communities.

To address the broadband issue, Humiston is leading an initiative to document mobile internet speed across California – including rural areas. In April 2019, Humiston plans to enlist 4-H members across the state to test internet speed using the free smartphone app CalSpeed several times over a period of a week.

“This will give us a snapshot of mobile broadband service availability,” Humiston said.

The crisis in the Sierra Nevada – where millions of trees died from the drought of 2010-16 – could prompt the development of high-value uses of biomass and establish a market for biomass derived in the agricultural sector, she said.

Humiston also took the opportunity to ask participants to help make sure the critical services UC ANR provides – including county-based UC Cooperative Extension, nine research and extension centers, the UC integrated pest management program, 4-H youth development, UC Master Gardeners and others – continue to fuel the California economy. Diminished funding from the State of California is taking a toll on the UC ANR budget.

“We need people like you to work with the VINE to set up improved support,” Humiston said.

Posted on Monday, October 8, 2018 at 2:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation

Better soil boosts farm profit and benefits the planet

Healthy soil does much more than hold plants upright on the surface of the earth. It is a mix of mineral bits and old plant particles teeming with microbes to form a mysterious and complex web of life scientists are just beginning to understand.

While scientists use high technology to study heathy soil – painstakingly counting soil worms and bugs, sequencing the DNA of soil bacteria, for example – some farmers know intuitively whether the soil is healthy just by walking on it.

Scott Park is a first-generation Meridian, Calif., farmer. “When I step on a field and it feels like a road, something is wrong,” he said. “If it feels like a marshmallow or sponge, that's good.”

An overflow crowd at the UC West Side Research and Extension Center learns about the benefits of farming practices that promote healthy soil.

Park shared his farming experiences with 200 farmers, industry representatives, University of California Cooperative Extension scientists, Fresno State students, news media and others during a half-day UC workshop at the UC West Side Research and Extension Center in Five Points.

“The last 31 years I've been on a mission of building soil,” Park said. “I discovered it by accident and I've made lots of mistakes. But yields trend upwards every year on every crop. Being sensitive to building soil, I'm making a lot of money. And if I'm doing something for the earth, all the better.”

Park said he adds 10 to 15 tons per acre of biomass to his farm every year. He's using less fertilizer, up to 20 percent less water, and even experimenting on the farm by growing a commercial crop with just four inputs: cover crops, water, seed and sun.

“We got high-yielding, good-quality crops,” Park said. “Nobody was more shocked than I am that I got a good crop.”

Soil samples on the left break down quickly in water. On the right, healthy soil absorbs water without breaking down.

Researchers are now using the scientific method to figure out the root causes of these empirical observations.

“There's a lot going on in soil,” said Radomir Schmidt, a UC Davis soil microbiologist who spoke at the soil health field day.

A teaspoon of soil has a billion bacteria and six miles of fungal hyphae, the filaments that branch out through the soil from fungi, Schmidt said. The microbes' interaction with living plant roots, the larger pores left by decomposing vegetation and tunneling worms and insects create a system that confers resilience to unforeseen challenges – such as pest pressure, torrential rainfall and plant diseases.

The field day was held under a tent pitched adjacent to an 18-year research trial at the 320-acre facility. The trial compares four farming systems side by side:

  1. Conventional system, with annual soil tillage and no cover crops.
  2. Conservation agriculture, with no tilling whatsoever and annual winter cover crops.
  3. No-till without the cover crop.
  4. Conventional tilling with a cover crop.

“Take a look over my shoulder to see the difference,” said Jeff Mitchell, UC Cooperative Extension specialist and the study leader. “We've found the cover crops and no-till reduce water needs, cut dust, and lower costs. And there may be more benefits than we realized.”

For example, a graduate student counted the worms, bugs, beetles and other microfauna in soil samples from each of the treatments. There were double the amount in the no-till, cover crop plots compared to the conventional farming system.

Randall Southard, UC ANR soil researcher, standing in a bulldozed pit, shows the characteristics of soil beneath conservation agriculture trials at the West Side REC.

UC Cooperative Extension specialist Sloan Rice found that cover crops promote water retention in the soil after rainfall. There is very little water evaporation from the soil surface and water transportation from the cover crop plants in the winter, so little water is lost. Cover crops also promote more water infiltration below three feet.

“Cover crops for sustainable water management is particularly important considering the water supply availability and its cost,” Rice said.

Healthy soil management also shows promise in confronting global climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil, rather than depleting it.

Manager of Sano Farms in Firebaugh, Jesse Sanchez, was a speaker at the field day. He wasn't surprised by the overflow crowd.

“Farmers are more and more curious. They see some of us using cover crops, and they want to learn more,” Sanchez said. “There has been a swell of interest. I have a tremendous number of visitors every year.”

Field day participants take a close look at the soil.

For more information about soil building, see the UC Conservation Agriculture Systems Innovation website at http://casi.ucanr.edu

Posted on Monday, June 12, 2017 at 2:26 PM

Pitch It, Plant It, Grow It

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a great idea! The Horticulture Innovation Lab Demonstration Center on the UC Davis campus is spearheading a "Pitch & Plant Gardening...

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 27, 2016 at 5:51 PM
 
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