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Posts Tagged: Western Tiger Swallowtail

What's in a Name? Western Tiger Swallowtail

It's not "officially" spring until we see--and photograph--the spectacular Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. That's what I posted...

A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, an image taken in 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, an image taken in 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, an image taken in 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 16, 2022 at 5:14 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

Throw a Little Shade on Me, Please

Are you tired of the triple-digit temperatures? Wish someone would throw a breeze your way and provide a little shade?  A honey bee...

A honey bee and a butterfly, a Western tiger swallowtail sharing some nectar on a Mexican sunflower in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a butterfly, a Western tiger swallowtail sharing some nectar on a Mexican sunflower in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a butterfly, a Western tiger swallowtail sharing some nectar on a Mexican sunflower in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"This flower isn't big enough for both of us!" The Western tiger swallowtail lifts off, providing an umbrella—a little shade—on a triple-digit temperature day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"This flower isn't big enough for both of us!" The Western tiger swallowtail lifts off, providing an umbrella—a little shade—on a triple-digit temperature day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 20, 2021 at 3:30 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Day 3 of National Pollinator Week: Watch for the Tigers!

It's Day 3 of National Pollinator Week. Fortunately, a tiger came to visit us--no, not the predatory jungle animal, Panthera tigris, but a...

A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail forages on a Mexican sunflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail forages on a Mexican sunflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged Western tiger swallowtail forages on a Mexican sunflower in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Faster than a speeding bullet? It seems like it. A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, heads straight for the Western tiger swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Faster than a speeding bullet? It seems like it. A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, heads straight for the Western tiger swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Faster than a speeding bullet? It seems like it. A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, heads straight for the Western tiger swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Alarmed that it's a target, the Western tiger swallowtail rises. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Alarmed that it's a target, the Western tiger swallowtail rises. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Alarmed that it's a target, the Western tiger swallowtail rises. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a flash, the Western tiger swallowtail rapidly leaves its perch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In a flash, the Western tiger swallowtail rapidly leaves its perch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a flash, the Western tiger swallowtail rapidly leaves its perch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail is up, up and away from the male territorial bee, the Melissodes agilis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Western tiger swallowtail is up, up and away from the male territorial bee, the Melissodes agilis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail is up, up and away from the male territorial bee, the Melissodes agilis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 23, 2021 at 3:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Hello, Spring! Welcome, Western Tiger Swallowtail

Hello, spring! It's not "officially" spring until we see--and photograph--the spectacular Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus. One landed...

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, missing part of its tails, nectars March 30 on a lilac bush at a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The nectar met with this butterfly's approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Western tiger swallowtail on the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to take flight, the Western tiger swallowtail sips a little more nectar from the lilac bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 2, 2021 at 4:17 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Eye on the Tiger

So here, you are, a Western Tiger Swallowtail sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower. You are a Papilo rutulus. And your menu...

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilo rutulus, lands on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilo rutulus, lands on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilo rutulus, lands on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifolia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A dark shadow heads toward the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A dark shadow heads toward the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A dark shadow heads toward the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male territorial long-horned bee, buzzes the Western Tiger Swallowtail, like a jet fighter plane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male territorial long-horned bee, buzzes the Western Tiger Swallowtail, like a jet fighter plane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male territorial long-horned bee, buzzes the Western Tiger Swallowtail, like a jet fighter plane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Right wing? Left wing? Up the middle. The male territorial longhorned bee tries to dislodge the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Right wing? Left wing? Up the middle. The male territorial longhorned bee tries to dislodge the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Right wing? Left wing? Up the middle. The male territorial longhorned bee tries to dislodge the Western Tiger Swallowtail. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming for you! The male territorial bee roars up over the Mexican sunflower as the Western Tiger Swallowtail scrambles for safety. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm coming for you! The male territorial bee roars up over the Mexican sunflower as the Western Tiger Swallowtail scrambles for safety. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming for you! The male territorial bee roars up over the Mexican sunflower as the Western Tiger Swallowtail scrambles for safety. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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