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Posts Tagged: UC Davis

Ever Seen a Wasp Colony in a Frog's Mouth?

In real life, frogs eat flies, mosquitoes, bees, wasps and other insects.  But have you ever seen a frog's mouth filled with an entire...

Adrienne R. Shapiro of Davis captured this image of a nesting European paper wasps in the mouth of a garden frog statue in a Davis neighborhood. (Photo courtesy of Adrienne R. Shapiro)
Adrienne R. Shapiro of Davis captured this image of a nesting European paper wasps in the mouth of a garden frog statue in a Davis neighborhood. (Photo courtesy of Adrienne R. Shapiro)

Adrienne R. Shapiro of Davis captured this image of a nesting European paper wasps in the mouth of a garden frog statue in a Davis neighborhood. (Photo courtesy of Adrienne R. Shapiro)

A European paper wasp nest in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A European paper wasp nest in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp nest in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp peeks over a yellow rose in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A European paper wasp peeks over a yellow rose in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp peeks over a yellow rose in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps exiting a nest in a recycling bin at the University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasps exiting a nest in a recycling bin at the University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps exiting a nest in a recycling bin at the University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellowjacket drinking water on a hot day. Its black antennae distinguish it from the orange-tipped antennae of the European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellowjacket drinking water on a hot day. Its black antennae distinguish it from the orange-tipped antennae of the European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellowjacket drinking water on a hot day. Its black antennae distinguish it from the orange-tipped antennae of the European paper wasp. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 10, 2022 at 4:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Meet Ettamarie Peterson: Sonoma's Queen Bee and 4-H Beekeeping Queen

When 4-H beekeeping project leader Ettamarie Peterson of the Liberty 4-H Club, Petaluma, meets with her youth group at the beginning of the 4-H year,...

Petaluma beekeeper Ettamarie Peterson holds some newly emerged bees at a Randy Oliver demonstration at the 2007 Western Apicultural Society tour of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Petaluma beekeeper Ettamarie Peterson holds some newly emerged bees at a Randy Oliver demonstration at the 2007 Western Apicultural Society tour of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Petaluma beekeeper Ettamarie Peterson holds some newly emerged bees at a Randy Oliver demonstration at the 2007 Western Apicultural Society tour of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Veteran 4-H beekeeping project leader Ettamarie Peterson (far left) with some of her 4-H beekeepers from the Liberty 4-H Club, Petaluma.
Veteran 4-H beekeeping project leader Ettamarie Peterson (far left) with some of her 4-H beekeepers from the Liberty 4-H Club, Petaluma.

Veteran 4-H beekeeping project leader Ettamarie Peterson (far left) with some of her 4-H beekeepers from the Liberty 4-H Club, Petaluma.

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and a co-founder and six-term president of the Western Apicultural Society (WAS) hands Ettamarie Peterson an award at the 2009 society meeting. Mussen died June 3, 2022 of cancer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and a co-founder and six-term president of the Western Apicultural Society (WAS) hands Ettamarie Peterson an award at the 2009 society meeting. Mussen died June 3, 2022 of cancer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology and a co-founder and six-term president of the Western Apicultural Society (WAS) hands Ettamarie Peterson an award at the 2009 society meeting. Mussen died June 3, 2022 of cancer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ettamarie Peterson, known as the Sonoma County Queen Bee, stands by the bee sculpture, Miss Bee Haven, that anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (2007 Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ettamarie Peterson, known as the Sonoma County Queen Bee, stands by the bee sculpture, Miss Bee Haven, that anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (2007 Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ettamarie Peterson, known as the Sonoma County Queen Bee, stands by the bee sculpture, Miss Bee Haven, that anchors the UC Davis Bee Haven. (2007 Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Bee mine!" Beekeeper Ettamarie Peterson holds nurse bees at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, in 2007. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Bee mine!" Beekeeper Ettamarie Peterson holds nurse bees at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, in 2007. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 9, 2022 at 5:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: 4-H, Agriculture, Environment, Innovation

National Moth Week: Here's One Moth that Beekeepers Won't Celebrate

During the 11th annual National Moth Week, one thing's for sure: Beekeepers won't be celebrating the beauty, life cycle, or habitat of...

The larvae of the Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella) inside a bee hive. The black dotes are small hive beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The larvae of the Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella) inside a bee hive. The black dotes are small hive beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The larvae of the Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella) inside a bee hive. The black dotes are small hive beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella), a night-flying moth that lays its eggs inside the cracks and crevices of a hive, inside and out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is a Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella), a night-flying moth that lays its eggs inside the cracks and crevices of a hive, inside and out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a Greater Wax Moth (Galleria mellonella), a night-flying moth that lays its eggs inside the cracks and crevices of a hive, inside and out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a Bohart Museum of Entomology specimen, the Greater Wax Moth. (Photo by Jeff Smith)
This is a Bohart Museum of Entomology specimen, the Greater Wax Moth. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

This is a Bohart Museum of Entomology specimen, the Greater Wax Moth. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

This is a Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella, from the Bohart Museum of Entomology collection. (Photo by Jeff Smith)
This is a Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella, from the Bohart Museum of Entomology collection. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

This is a Lesser Wax Moth, Achroia grisella, from the Bohart Museum of Entomology collection. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

Posted on Friday, July 29, 2022 at 2:13 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Dogging the Dogface Butterfly

They dogged the dogface butterfly.  In celebrating the California dogface butterfly, Zerene eurydice, visitors at the Bohart Museum of...

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas talks about the history of the California dogface butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas talks about the history of the California dogface butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas talks about the history of the California dogface butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Fran Keller of Folsom Lake College reads her children’s book, “The Story of the Dogface Butterfly,” available in the gift Shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Professor Fran Keller of Folsom Lake College reads her children’s book, “The Story of the Dogface Butterfly,” available in the gift Shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Fran Keller of Folsom Lake College reads her children’s book, “The Story of the Dogface Butterfly,” available in the gift Shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis students Kaitai Liu and Sol Wantz check out the Bohart’s live petting zoo, including Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and stick insects. Wantz is the incoming president of the UC Davis Entomology Club. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis students Kaitai Liu and Sol Wantz check out the Bohart’s live petting zoo, including Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and stick insects. Wantz is the incoming president of the UC Davis Entomology Club. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis students Kaitai Liu and Sol Wantz check out the Bohart’s live petting zoo, including Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and stick insects. Wantz is the incoming president of the UC Davis Entomology Club. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis students Danielle Sion and Amberly Hackmann staff the felt dogface butterfly table.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis students Danielle Sion and Amberly Hackmann staff the felt dogface butterfly table.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis students Danielle Sion and Amberly Hackmann staff the felt dogface butterfly table.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum lab assistant Brennen Dyer (in back, center) staffs the Bohart Museum gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart Museum lab assistant Brennen Dyer (in back, center) staffs the Bohart Museum gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum lab assistant Brennen Dyer (in back, center) staffs the Bohart Museum gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey (right) director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, cut one of the two specially made cakes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lynn Kimsey (right) director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, cut one of the two specially made cakes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Kimsey (right) director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator, cut one of the two specially made cakes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Guests enjoyed the specially made cakes featuring a male dogface butterfly (shown) and a female dogface butterfly. They were the work of Tiffany Warrick of CreaTions N' EvenTs, Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Guests enjoyed the specially made cakes featuring a male dogface butterfly (shown) and a female dogface butterfly. They were the work of Tiffany Warrick of CreaTions N' EvenTs, Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Guests enjoyed the specially made cakes featuring a male dogface butterfly (shown) and a female dogface butterfly. They were the work of Tiffany Warrick of CreaTions N' EvenTs, Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 18, 2022 at 11:19 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Meet a Longhorned Bee

Picture this. A female Melissodes agilis, the so-called "agile longhorned bee," is foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia...

A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Melissodes agilis foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female Melissodes agilis continues foraging on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Proboscis out, the female Melissodes agilis is finished foraging on the Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundifola, and ready to leave. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 14, 2022 at 4:58 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

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