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Posts Tagged: Mediterranean

The Medfly 'Through the Decades': Tune in to Hear Professor Carey on July 3

Remember when scientists first detected the Mediterranean fruit fly in California? It was the early 1980s. The invasive insect, better known as the...

Distinguished Professor James R. Carey is known for his outstanding research, outreach and advocacy program involving invasion biology, specifically the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (medfly) and the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Distinguished Professor James R. Carey is known for his outstanding research, outreach and advocacy program involving invasion biology, specifically the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (medfly) and the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Distinguished Professor James R. Carey is known for his outstanding research, outreach and advocacy program involving invasion biology, specifically the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (medfly) and the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Of Medflies and Light Brown Apple Moths

Congratulations to James R. Carey, distinguished professor of entomology at the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology for his public...

UC Davis Distinguished Professor James R. Carey with some of the maps he used in his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis Distinguished Professor James R. Carey with some of the maps he used in his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis Distinguished Professor James R. Carey with some of the maps he used in his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 5, 2015 at 5:15 PM

Medflies: Permanent Residents

Breaking news shook the agricultural world today. The Mediterranean fruit fly, considered the world's worst agricultural pest, is one of at least...

Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

The Invasion of Tropical Fruit Flies

From a trickle to a flood. But why? Professor James R. Carey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology will tell you why. He will discuss the...

Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)
Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

Mediterranean Fruit Fly. (Photo by Jack Kelly Clark)

Posted on Friday, March 22, 2013 at 9:11 PM

Olive Tree: Beauty and Bane

Do you have an olive tree, Olea europaea, in your landscape? We do - a 'Kalamata' olive. It's a beautiful evergreen tree that, once established, requires very little water. The pollen can be highly allergenic. Ten years ago, we brought it home from the Vacaville Home and Garden Show.  It was a spindly little stick, not more than ten inches tall from root ball to tip. We were excited at the prospect of harvesting our own olives and curing them with a method my husband read about that used only water and salt instead of lye. Let me say, LOTS of water and salt. We planted it in the back portion of our vegetable garden, about two feet from the fence line. No, I was not a master gardener ten years ago, or I would have known to plant it farther from the fence.

Over the years, it's grown to about 20+ feet tall. Since then, that vegetable garden has been relocated to accommodate a swimming pool, the size of which was dictated by the location of the olive tree. My husband and I are out there pruning the tree a few times a year to keep it from hanging over the neighbor's yard. In the spring, the yellow pollen from the tree coats the patio and chairs in a thick yellow dust. From now until January, I am constantly picking up dropped olives to alleviate staining of the concrete. And the olives we were going to cure? Haven't eaten a single one. On the upside, the tree provides a terrific area of shade to sit under, and lends a distinctively Mediterranean atmosphere to the backyard. It is a beautiful tree.

So what have I learned from this tree? Two feet between a tree and a fence is nowhere near enough. Curing olives takes time and patience. Even though olive trees grow well in Solano County, don't plant them near a pool!

 

Don't put a pool next to an olive tree.

Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2012 at 8:56 AM
Tags: allergenic (1), fruit drop (1), Kalamatal (1), Mediterranean (3), Olea europaea (1), olive (9), olives (11), pollen (37), pool (1)

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