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Posts Tagged: Jeff Smith

Bohart Museum Butterfly Donor Chuck Hageman Leaves a Lasting Legacy

When the Northern California Lepidopterists met in February of 2019 at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis,...

Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows visitors some of the butterfly specimens. The  worldwide Lepidoptera collection now totals more than 500,000. One of the most recent donors was the late Charles Hageman of Yuba City (1945-2021). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows visitors some of the butterfly specimens. The worldwide Lepidoptera collection now totals more than 500,000. One of the most recent donors was the late Charles Hageman of Yuba City (1945-2021). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows visitors some of the butterfly specimens. The worldwide Lepidoptera collection now totals more than 500,000. One of the most recent donors was the late Charles Hageman of Yuba City (1945-2021). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 23, 2021 at 4:06 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

How Jeff Smith’s 'Neighborly' Project Will Benefit the Bohart Museum of Entomology

A “neighborly” project by entomologist Jeff Smith, the volunteer curator of the worldwide Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of...

Entomologist Jeff Smith talks to visitors at a summer open house, pre-COVID precautions, at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Smith curates the collection.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith talks to visitors at a summer open house, pre-COVID precautions, at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Smith curates the collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith talks to visitors at a summer open house, pre-COVID precautions, at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Smith curates the collection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

James
James "Jim" Steed, president and owner of the Neighborly Pest Management, Roseville, with some of the framed insect displays, the work of Jeff Smith. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

James "Jim" Steed, president and owner of the Neighborly Pest Management, Roseville, with some of the framed insect displays, the work of Jeff Smith. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

This is one of the framed displays of insect specimens by Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. He created 10 framed displays for the Neighborly Pest Management, Roseville. Jeff Smith donated the funds to the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Jeff Smith)
This is one of the framed displays of insect specimens by Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. He created 10 framed displays for the Neighborly Pest Management, Roseville. Jeff Smith donated the funds to the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

This is one of the framed displays of insect specimens by Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. He created 10 framed displays for the Neighborly Pest Management, Roseville. Jeff Smith donated the funds to the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Jeff Smith)

Posted on Monday, November 8, 2021 at 3:59 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

In Celebration of the Bohart Museum's 75th Year

So much is happening at the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis. Or about to happen! If you're a member of the...

As part of Aggie Pride Week or Spirit Week, the Bohart Museum displayed some of its insect specimens.
As part of Aggie Pride Week or Spirit Week, the Bohart Museum displayed some of its insect specimens.

As part of Aggie Pride Week or Spirit Week, the Bohart Museum displayed some of its insect specimens.

Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, shows some of the displays to a visitor.
Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum, shows some of the displays to a visitor.

Posted on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 at 9:14 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Hornworms Are Not Your Friends

If you love tomatoes, you probably hate hornworms. Frankly, the garden's not big enough for both of you, and one of you has to go. It's not...

This hornworm is feeding on a pepper plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This hornworm is feeding on a pepper plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This hornworm is feeding on a pepper plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When the caterpillar or larva  is disturbed, it
When the caterpillar or larva is disturbed, it "rears up into an Egyptian sphinx-like pose," says entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When the caterpillar or larva is disturbed, it "rears up into an Egyptian sphinx-like pose," says entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The frass (droppings) from a  hornworm. It's a tell-tale sign you have hornworms in your garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The frass (droppings) from a hornworm. It's a tell-tale sign you have hornworms in your garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The frass (droppings) from a hornworm. It's a tell-tale sign you have hornworms in your garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The tomato hornworm turns into a  sphinx moth or hummingbird moth (family Sphingidae). (Wikipedia Photo)
The tomato hornworm turns into a sphinx moth or hummingbird moth (family Sphingidae). (Wikipedia Photo)

The tomato hornworm turns into a sphinx moth or hummingbird moth (family Sphingidae). (Wikipedia Photo)

Posted on Monday, August 30, 2021 at 8:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

To Be an Underwing Underfoot

You can be an understudy or you can be an underwing. Or underfoot. Have you ever seen an underwing, a moth in the...

An underwing moth,  maybe a Catocala amatrix, with tattered wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An underwing moth, maybe a Catocala amatrix, with tattered wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An underwing moth, maybe a Catocala amatrix, with tattered wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 9, 2021 at 4:29 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

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