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Posts Tagged: Habropoda miserabilis

A Silver Digger Bee in Flight at Bodega Head

So there we were, checking out the bumble bee mimics (Anthophora bomboides stanfordiana) on May 9 at Bodega Head, Sonoma County,...

A female Habropoda miserabilis in flight at Bodega Head on May 9. This silver digger bee was heading for mustard and wild radish. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Habropoda miserabilis in flight at Bodega Head on May 9. This silver digger bee was heading for mustard and wild radish. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Habropoda miserabilis in flight at Bodega Head on May 9. This silver digger bee was heading for mustard and wild radish. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 19, 2022 at 10:58 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Why Silver Digger Bees Are Like Gold

Why silver digger bees are like gold... Remember those "long lost" silver digger bees found last week at the San Francisco Presidio? They hadn't...

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)
Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males.  (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)
Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.
This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

Posted on Monday, April 1, 2019 at 5:26 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Amazing Bee-Parasite Research of Leslie Saul-Gershenz

Evolutionary ecologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz goes places where many have been but few have ever really seen.  Bees and blister beetles, yes. We...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.
Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).
Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).

Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

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