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Posts Tagged: Bohart Museum of Entomology

A Very Hungry Bumble Bee

She was all bees-ness, this yellow-faced queen bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. There she was, foraging in a bed of steely blue-purple...

Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 at 4:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Art at the Bohart: The Work of Francisco and Brittany

Art is part of the Bohart. Talented artists continually create stunning work at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, directed by Lynn Kimsey, UC...

Bohart Museum laboratory assistant and artist Brittany Kohler worked on the
Bohart Museum laboratory assistant and artist Brittany Kohler worked on the "Birdwing Butterfly" display in late October. In back are Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart, who spread all the wings; and collections manager Brennen Dyer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum laboratory assistant and artist Brittany Kohler worked on the "Birdwing Butterfly" display in late October. In back are Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepidoptera collection at the Bohart, who spread all the wings; and collections manager Brennen Dyer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Birdwing Butterfly": the finished art work. Francisco Bassó Medel did the earlier sketch and the piece was put together by Brittany Kohler. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Birdwing Butterfly": the finished art work. Francisco Bassó Medel did the earlier sketch and the piece was put together by Brittany Kohler. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a birdwing butterfly, held by Brittany Kohler. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a birdwing butterfly, held by Brittany Kohler. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a birdwing butterfly, held by Brittany Kohler. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and butterfly collector Bill Patterson and his wife, Doris Brown, Sacramento residents, admire the
Bohart associate and butterfly collector Bill Patterson and his wife, Doris Brown, Sacramento residents, admire the "Spiral Galaxy of Butterflies." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate and butterfly collector Bill Patterson and his wife, Doris Brown, Sacramento residents, admire the "Spiral Galaxy of Butterflies." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 15, 2022 at 3:16 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Day That Dragonflies Sprang to Life

Dragonflies sprang to life in dazzling colors during the family arts-and-crafts activities at the recent Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on...

The arts-and-crafts activity at the Bohart Museum's dragonfly open house was a popular site. In the back (at left) is noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The arts-and-crafts activity at the Bohart Museum's dragonfly open house was a popular site. In the back (at left) is noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The arts-and-crafts activity at the Bohart Museum's dragonfly open house was a popular site. In the back (at left) is noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison of Sacramento. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

High school student Kate Phillips of the Da Vinci Charter Academy leads the dragonfly candle project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
High school student Kate Phillips of the Da Vinci Charter Academy leads the dragonfly candle project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

High school student Kate Phillips of the Da Vinci Charter Academy leads the dragonfly candle project. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart volunteer Barbara Heinsch of Davis coloring a dragonfly page. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart volunteer Barbara Heinsch of Davis coloring a dragonfly page. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart volunteer Barbara Heinsch of Davis coloring a dragonfly page. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sacramento residents Kay Lu of Sacramento and her daughter, Lena 7, loved creating the projects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sacramento residents Kay Lu of Sacramento and her daughter, Lena 7, loved creating the projects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sacramento residents Kay Lu of Sacramento and her daughter, Lena 7, loved creating the projects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ingredients for the dragonfly candles await the artists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ingredients for the dragonfly candles await the artists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ingredients for the dragonfly candles await the artists. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 10, 2022 at 4:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Bohart Museum Open House: Dragonflies Rule!

Dragonflies rule! That was the theme of the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house on Sunday afternoon, Nov. 6, and dragonflies do just...

Noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison shows a slide of Cora semiopaca at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison shows a slide of Cora semiopaca at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Noted dragonfly expert Rosser Garrison shows a slide of Cora semiopaca at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dragonfly experts at the Bohart Museum open house included Sandra Hunt-von Arb, with the Pacific Northwest Biological Resources Consultants, Inc.; Andy Rehn, stream ecologist with California Department of Fish and Wildlife; Rosser Garrison, formerly with the California Department of Food and Agriculture; and Greg Kareofelas, Bohart associate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dragonfly experts at the Bohart Museum open house included Sandra Hunt-von Arb, with the Pacific Northwest Biological Resources Consultants, Inc.; Andy Rehn, stream ecologist with California Department of Fish and Wildlife; Rosser Garrison, formerly with the California Department of Food and Agriculture; and Greg Kareofelas, Bohart associate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dragonfly experts at the Bohart Museum open house included Sandra Hunt-von Arb, with the Pacific Northwest Biological Resources Consultants, Inc.; Andy Rehn, stream ecologist with California Department of Fish and Wildlife; Rosser Garrison, formerly with the California Department of Food and Agriculture; and Greg Kareofelas, Bohart associate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christofer Brothers (left), a UC Davis doctoral student studying dragonflies, and Christopher Beatty, a visiting visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, offered their expertise at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Christofer Brothers (left), a UC Davis doctoral student studying dragonflies, and Christopher Beatty, a visiting visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, offered their expertise at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christofer Brothers (left), a UC Davis doctoral student studying dragonflies, and Christopher Beatty, a visiting visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, offered their expertise at the Bohart Museum open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christopher Beatty, a visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, is a co-editor and co-author of this newly published book,
Christopher Beatty, a visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, is a co-editor and co-author of this newly published book, "Dragonflies and Damselflies: Model Organisms for Ecological and Evolutionary Research," second edition. Fresh from the printers, it was among the dragonfly books displayed at the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Christopher Beatty, a visiting scholar in the Program for Conservation Genomics at Stanford University, co-edited this newly published book, "Dragonflies and Damselflies: Model Organisms for Ecological and Evolutionary Research," second edition. Fresh from the printers, it was among the dragonfly books displayed at the open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Bohart Museum display includes the world's largest dragonfly, Petalura ingentissima, discovered in 1908 in North Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This Bohart Museum display includes the world's largest dragonfly, Petalura ingentissima, discovered in 1908 in North Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This Bohart Museum display includes the world's largest dragonfly, Petalura ingentissima, discovered in 1908 in North Queensland, Australia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rosser Garrison answers questions following his seminar on dragonflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Rosser Garrison answers questions following his seminar on dragonflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rosser Garrison answers questions following his seminar on dragonflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum showcased dragonfly images by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. Here Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart, admires a river jewelwing, Calopteryx aequabilis, that Kareofelas photographed at the Klamath River. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Bohart Museum showcased dragonfly images by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. Here Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart, admires a river jewelwing, Calopteryx aequabilis, that Kareofelas photographed at the Klamath River. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Bohart Museum showcased dragonfly images by Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas. Here Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart, admires a river jewelwing, Calopteryx aequabilis, that Kareofelas photographed at the Klamath River. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 9, 2022 at 4:11 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Monarch Photography Display Graces Bohart Museum Hallway

Just before you enter the Bohart Museum of Entomology (located in Room 1124 of the Academic Surge Building at 455 Crocker Lane, UC Davis...

Larry Snyder's monarch photography display in the hallway opposite the entrance to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, Academic Surge Building.
Larry Snyder's monarch photography display in the hallway opposite the entrance to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, Academic Surge Building.

Larry Snyder's monarch photography display in the hallway opposite the entrance to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, Academic Surge Building.

Posted on Tuesday, November 8, 2022 at 4:12 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

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