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Posts Tagged: Robbin Thorp

Ria de Grassi Wins the Bumble Bee Contest!

Congratulations to UC Davis alumna and pollinator enthusiast Ria de Grassi of Davis, who spotted and photographed the first bumble bee of...

Pollinator enthusiast Ria de Grassi of Davis confers with UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house in 2017. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollinator enthusiast Ria de Grassi of Davis confers with UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house in 2017. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinator enthusiast Ria de Grassi of Davis confers with UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) at a Bohart Museum of Entomology open house in 2017. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) discusses with Ria de Grassi the unusual carpenter bee she found. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) discusses with Ria de Grassi the unusual carpenter bee she found. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) discusses with Ria de Grassi the unusual carpenter bee she found. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) answers questions at a 2017 Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) answers questions at a 2017 Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis distinguished emeritus professor Robbin Thorp (1933-2019) answers questions at a 2017 Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 9, 2023 at 6:52 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

No Cabbage White Butterfly, No Bumble Bee

No cabbage white butterfly, no bumble bee.  As of 4 p.m. today (Jan. 6), the two UC Davis "bug contests" underway--one, to collect the first...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in flight, heading toward lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in flight, heading toward lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in flight, heading toward lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on Italian Italian bugloss, Anchusa azurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on Italian Italian bugloss, Anchusa azurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on Italian Italian bugloss, Anchusa azurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, heading for a jade blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, heading for a jade blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, heading for a jade blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 6, 2023 at 3:56 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

In Search of the First Bumble Bee of the Year

What are you doing on New Year's Day? Well, weather permitting, you can begin searching for the first bumble bee of the year in the two-county area...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosenenskii, foraging on oxalis near the Benicia State Capitol grounds on Jan. 13, 2021. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on rosemary on Jan. 25, 2020 on the grounds of the Benicia Capitol State Historic Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, foraging on a rose on Jan. 25, 2020 in downtown Benicia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 29, 2022 at 2:56 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Very Hungry Bumble Bee

She was all bees-ness, this yellow-faced queen bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. There she was, foraging in a bed of steely blue-purple...

Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can you spot the bumble bee in this bed of Eryngium amethystinum in the Sunset Gardens, Sonoma Cornerstone? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows the characteristic yellow face and yellow stripe on the abdomen of a yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. She is nectaring Eryngium amethystinum, in the Sunset Gardens at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With her long proboscis, B. vosnesenskii sips nectar from an Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the yellow face of the yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bombus vosnesenskii moves around the Eryngium amethystinum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, Bombus vosnesenskii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 at 4:46 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

When a 'Teddy Bear Bee' Became 'Mr. October'

We usually see male Valley carpenter bees, Xylocopa sonorina, in the spring and summer, but in the fall? On Oct. 17? But there he was, the...

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, engages in nectar robbing by drilling a hole in the corolla of the Mexican petunia to steal the nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, engages in nectar robbing by drilling a hole in the corolla of the Mexican petunia to steal the nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, engages in nectar robbing by drilling a hole in the corolla of the Mexican petunia to steal the nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male Valley carpenter bee, or
This male Valley carpenter bee, or "the teddy bear bee," wiggles to reach the nectar of a Mexican petunia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male Valley carpenter bee, or "the teddy bear bee," wiggles to reach the nectar of a Mexican petunia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, leaves a Mexican petunia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, leaves a Mexican petunia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa sonorina, leaves a Mexican petunia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 19, 2022 at 8:37 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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