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Posts Tagged: wine

Agriculture to take a hit, but people still need to eat during coronavirus crisis

The shut downs and self isolation sweeping across the country to curb the spread of coronavirus likely will not impact agricultural staple foods, but high-end wines and specialty ag products grown in California may suffer, reported Tim Hearden in Western Farm Press.

Hearden interviewed Dan Sumner, director of UC Agriculture and Natural Resources' Agricultural Issues Center.

He said some California agricultural products see demand increase during tough economic times, such as less expensive wines.

“Central Valley grapes are nearly recession-proof,” he said. “When the stock market collapses or the dot-com busts, nobody's buying $200 bottles of wine anymore.”

Sumner said Midwestern corn and grains will hold their own, however California products like almonds, pistachios, walnuts, strawberries, raspberries and even some leafy greens may "slip off the plate."

Wine sales may also be hurt by California Gov. Gavin Newsom's decision to close winery tasting rooms, restaurants, bars and pubs. Wineries are allowed to remain open for pick-up and winery business and production operations.

Hearden noted in his article that many UC Cooperative Extension workshops and other ag-related public events were canceled, including Ag Day festivities at the state Capitol that were set for March 18.

High-end wine sales will likely be hurt by restrictions in place to curb the coronavirus. (Photo: Pixabay)
Posted on Tuesday, March 17, 2020 at 8:48 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

California winemakers' concern over new Chinese tariffs is all about the future

China imports quite a bit of wine, however, very little comes from the United States. At the same time, per capita consumption of wine in China remains very low. So why are California winemakers anxious about tariffs newly imposed by China on U.S. wine? Because China's wine consumption habits are expected to change, reported UC ANR experts in an article posted on The Conversation and NPR websites.

"China is the world's fastest-growing wine market and is expected to soon become the second largest (wine market), after the U.S.," wrote UC Davis wine economist Julian M. Alsten, director of UC ANR's Agricultural Issues Center Daniel Sumner, and post-doctoral scholar Olena Sambucci.

Economists who have studied these markets project further significant growth in China's demand for wine, including premium wine imports, the article said.

"This would make getting pushed out of China especially troubling at a time when global per capita wine consumption has been declining, especially in Europe," the authors wrote.

California winemakers are concerned about new Chinese tariffs on wine imports, even though per capita consumption of wine in the country remains low. 'It's all about the future,' say UC ANR experts. (Photo: UCCE Mendocino County)
Posted on Friday, April 13, 2018 at 11:21 AM
Tags: Dan Sumner (32), Julian Alsten (1), Wine (28)
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture

Autumn wildfire set up research on 'smoke taint' in wine

With the value of wine riding on a delicate balance of aroma and flavor, the impact of winegrapes' exposure to smoke from a wildfire could have significant economic consequences. Last fall's Northern California wildfires sent smoke wafting over an experimental vineyard in Napa Valley, giving scientists the opportunity to study the interplay of smoke and wine quality, reported Jeff Quackenbush in the North Bay Business Journal.

"The moment the smoke started, my phone started ringing off the hook," said Anita Olberholster, UC Cooperative Extension viticulture and enology specialist. “I quickly realized how thin the data is I need to base recommendations on.”

Aerial view of smoke from the 2017 fires in Napa and Sonoma counties. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 4.0)

The fires near the UC Davis vineyard provided the perfect experimental platform. Olberholster and her research team sprang into action to start a research project on the fly. Remaining grapes on smoke-exposed vines were picked, loads of commercially grown grapes deemed too questionable for commercial wineries were accepted. Over the past five months, small batches of wine were made from the grapes.

“They all have different levels of smoky character,” Olberholster said. “Some on the nose are actually quite pleasant and not smoky, but the aftertaste is the problem. All of them, even if in small amounts, had that ‘old smoke,' ‘ashtray,' ‘new smoke' aftertaste. It all depends on how sensitive you're going to be at it.”

The scientists are now looking for a process that will remove the smoky compounds, as little as possible of anything else.

Posted on Friday, April 6, 2018 at 8:34 AM
Tags: Anita Olberholster (2), smoke taint (2), wildfire (141), wine (28)
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development

February Promises to Be 'Honey of a Month' for UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center

A honey bee pollinating an orange blossom. Orange blossom honey will be among the varietals featured at the

February promises to be a "honey of a month" for the Honey and Pollination Center, UC Davis. Thank the girls (the worker bees), the honey they...

A honey bee pollinating an orange blossom. Orange blossom honey will be among the varietals featured at the
A honey bee pollinating an orange blossom. Orange blossom honey will be among the varietals featured at the "World of Honey" event, sponsored by the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee pollinating an orange blossom. Orange blossom honey will be among the varietals featured at the "World of Honey" event, sponsored by the UC Davis Honey and Pollination Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Farm advisor Lindsay Jordan creating options for vineyard sustainability

Lindsay Jordan
UC Cooperative Extension advisor Lindsay Jordan is growing 56 varieties of grapes at the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center to see how varietals from other parts of the world flourish or fail, reported Sydney Maki in the Fresno Bee.

The front-page story provided an overview of Jordan's career, research plans and personality.

“My love of wine drives a lot – what can I say,” Jordan said. “I don't know about you, but I want to keep drinking wine until the day I die, so I really want to do my part to ensure the sustainability of drinking California wine.”

As part of the project, Jordan is looking for grapevines that thrive in the valley heat, produce a large crop and develop berries with color, flavor and acidity needed for fine wines.

"I won't declare any winners," Jordan said. "I'll say I have favorites, and I definitely have losers that I would not recommend.

The project was started by James Wolpert, a retired UC Cooperative Extension viticulture specialist, and continued by Matthew Fidelibus, UCCE viticulture specialist based at Kearney. Jordan took over the project a year and a half ago.

Finding the next cabernet sauvignon or chardonnay would be a home run, Fidelibus said. However, the data supplied by the project are also important in providing farmers and wineries the research and background to expand their own vineyards.

“If any of these varieties are going to be useful, it's important that the wineries are interested and comfortable with them,” Fidelibus said. “The grower can't grow varieties without the assurance that a winery is going to use them.”

 
Posted on Monday, August 1, 2016 at 4:00 PM
Tags: Lindsay Jordan (2), viticulture (15), wine (28)

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