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Posts Tagged: tachinid fly

Parasitoid Palooza! Or What Ate My Caterpillar or Chrysalis

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So you're trying to rear monarch butterflies. You notice an egg on your milkweed plant, and watch its life cycle from egg to caterpillar to...

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This monarch chrysalis is filled with tachinid fly larvae, about to emerge. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult  tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly larva emerges from a monarch chrysalis. It will turn brown, harden, and become a pupa--and eventually, an adult tachinid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 13, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Taking on the Tachinids

Tachinid fly

They're hairy. They're bristly. They're attention-getters. They probably draw more "yecchs!" than most insects. All the more reason to love...

Tachinid fly
Tachinid fly "in the pink." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly "in the pink." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tachinid fly foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tachinid fly foraging. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 30, 2012 at 9:42 PM

The End Is Near

Two cellar spiders work together to capture a Tachinid fly in their web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The parasitic fly (family Tachinidae) never had a chance. It went from floral visitor to spider prey to spider dinner when it made a single solitary...

Two cellar spiders work together to capture a Tachinid fly in their web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two cellar spiders work together to capture a Tachinid fly in their web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two cellar spiders work together to capture a Tachinid fly in their web. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While one spider wraps the fly, another bites it in the head, paralyzing it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
While one spider wraps the fly, another bites it in the head, paralyzing it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While one spider wraps the fly, another bites it in the head, paralyzing it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the fatal bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the fatal bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the fatal bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 13, 2011 at 8:40 PM

A Fly -- Oh, My!

Tachinid Fly

It's a curious-looking insect, the tachinid fly. The first thing you notice are the thick, dark bristles covering its abdomen. By human standards,...

Tachinid Fly
Tachinid Fly

TACHINID FLY is covered with thick, dark bristles on its abdomen. In its larval stage, this insect parasitizes caterpillars, especially Lepidoptera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2009 at 3:02 PM

Dracula in the Garden

Pitcher plant

The red-pigmented white pitcher plant we purchased at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Faire looks like a flamboyant...

Pitcher plant
Pitcher plant

This is a pitcher plant, Sarracenia leucophylla. It's carnivorous. The tubular leaf (left) is spent. The other two are ready to trap insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trapped Tachinid Fly
Trapped Tachinid Fly

A tachinid (parasitic) fly tries to exit the pitcher plant, Sarracenia leucophylla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 21, 2008 at 12:48 PM

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