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Posts Tagged: stink bug

Let's Hear It for Biocontrol, Integrated Pest Management

An assassin bug drills a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Let's hear it for biocontrol. You've seen lady beetles, aka ladybugs, preying on aphids. But have you seen an assassin bug attack a spotted...

An assassin bug drills a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug drills a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug drills a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, snares an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, snares an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, snares an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider munches on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider munches on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider munches on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A great blue heron engages in a little pest management: it catches a rodent at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A great blue heron engages in a little pest management: it catches a rodent at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A great blue heron engages in a little pest management: it catches a rodent at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The great blue heron gets its prey in position before swallowing it whole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The great blue heron gets its prey in position before swallowing it whole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The great blue heron gets its prey in position before swallowing it whole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Please Eat a Stink Bug!

A praying mantis at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, dines on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, if we could just engage in some menu planning and preparation! How often have you thought of that after watching praying mantids dine on honey...

A praying mantis at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, dines on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, dines on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, dines on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology graduate student Charlotte Herbert, who is seeking her doctorate, takes a selfie with a praying mantis eating a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis entomology graduate student Charlotte Herbert, who is seeking her doctorate, takes a selfie with a praying mantis eating a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis entomology graduate student Charlotte Herbert, who is seeking her doctorate, takes a selfie with a praying mantis eating a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 at 5:26 PM

The Butterfly and the Stink Bug

Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's sort of like "The Beauty and the Beast." Or "The Pollinator and the Pest." A gorgeous Western Tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus), seeking...

Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, lands on a butterfly bush. Note the stink bug on top. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Western tiger swallowtail quickly jerks back as it spots the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! A sip of a nectar and a view of the stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 at 6:34 PM

Stink Bugs Do It, Too!

Red-shouldered stink bugs mating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Birds do it," sang Ella Fitzgerald. "Bees do it..." "Even educated" (insert "stink bugs") "do it." But she didn't sing that; that wasn't part of...

Red-shouldered stink bugs mating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Red-shouldered stink bugs mating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Red-shouldered stink bugs mating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stink bug laying eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Stink bug laying eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Stink bug laying eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of stink bug eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of stink bug eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of stink bug eggs on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 12, 2014 at 5:23 PM

Exotic stink bug threatens nearly nationwide damage

Brown marmorated stink bug (USDA photo)
Another pest has been added to the list of exotic insects that dishearten California farmers. The brown marmorated stink bug, a destructive native of Asia, has been seen this spring in 33 states, including California, Oregon and Washington, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

"All that we do know for certain is that a tremendously large population went into overwintering in fall 2010. So, if they survived, there could be a very large population emerging in the spring," the story quoted Tracy Leskey, a research entomologist at the U.S. Agriculture Department's Appalachian Fruit Research Station in Kearneysville, W.Va.

The stink bug will feed on almost anything, including cherries, tomatoes, grapes, lima beans, soybeans, green peppers, apples and peaches. When it feeds, it leaves behind an ugly spot that renders the fruit or vegetable unmarketable.

UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor Stephen Vasquez and viticulture specialist Matt Fidelibus warned of the new pest's potential to harm California grape crops in a post to their new Viticulture blog. They wrote that damage can be substantial when BMSB populations are not identified early and managed appropriately. Growers and wineries are also concerned that the “stink” from any bugs accidentally crushed in wine or juice grapes could taint the product with off flavors.

"One might define this thing as the bug from hell," U.S. Congressman Roscoe Bartlett told the Chron. "If I was a mad scientist doing gene splicing and putting together a bug that would really be nasty and I was turning it loose on my enemy, I probably couldn't do a better job."

The Chronicle said the best hope for farmers that have brown marmorated stink bugs is the insecticide dinotefuran, the active ingredient in the commercial products Venom and Scorpion. The chemical compound is labeled by the Environmental Protection Agency for use on vegetables, grapes and cotton, but not in orchards, as it is in Japan and other Asian countries.

More information about the BMSB and current research is available in a streamed PowerPoint presentation by USDA's Lesky posted on the web.

Posted on Tuesday, May 24, 2011 at 10:59 AM

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