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Posts Tagged: sex

UC Davis Chemical Ecologist Walter Leal Says We're Like Bolas Spiders: Here's Why!

Walter Leal, distinguished professor in the UC Davis Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, studies the molecular basis of insect olfaction, unraveling how insects detect chemicals and using that knowledge to inform pest management techniques. (Photo by David Slipher, College of Biological Sciences)

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal characterizes the work in his lab as "like bolas spiders." What are bolas spiders? Well, they're also known...

Walter Leal, distinguished professor in the UC Davis Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, studies the molecular basis of insect olfaction, unraveling how insects detect chemicals and using that knowledge to inform pest management techniques. (Photo by David Slipher, College of Biological Sciences)
Walter Leal, distinguished professor in the UC Davis Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, studies the molecular basis of insect olfaction, unraveling how insects detect chemicals and using that knowledge to inform pest management techniques. (Photo by David Slipher, College of Biological Sciences)

Walter Leal, distinguished professor in the UC Davis Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, studies the molecular basis of insect olfaction, unraveling how insects detect chemicals and using that knowledge to inform pest management techniques. (Photo by David Slipher, College of Biological Sciences)

Posted on Thursday, May 30, 2019 at 3:54 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Targeting the Asian Citrus Psyllid

The Asian Citrus Psyllid Team:  Scientists in the front row (from left) are Tatiana Mulinari, Rodrigo Magnani, Antonio Juliano Ayres, Walter Leal, Marcelo Miranda, Victoria Esperanca, Odimar Zanardi, and Rejane Luvizotto. The three scientists in back are Haroldo X. L. Volpe (white shirt) Renato de Freitas and  Rômulo Carvalho.

A major citrus pest may experience a “Bah, Humbug!” kind of year. If all goes as planned, UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal's...

The Asian Citrus Psyllid Team:  Scientists in the front row (from left) are Tatiana Mulinari, Rodrigo Magnani, Antonio Juliano Ayres, Walter Leal, Marcelo Miranda, Victoria Esperanca, Odimar Zanardi, and Rejane Luvizotto. The three scientists in back are Haroldo X. L. Volpe (white shirt) Renato de Freitas and  Rômulo Carvalho.
The Asian Citrus Psyllid Team: Scientists in the front row (from left) are Tatiana Mulinari, Rodrigo Magnani, Antonio Juliano Ayres, Walter Leal, Marcelo Miranda, Victoria Esperanca, Odimar Zanardi, and Rejane Luvizotto. The three scientists in back are Haroldo X. L. Volpe (white shirt) Renato de Freitas and Rômulo Carvalho.

The Asian Citrus Psyllid Team: Scientists in the front row (from left) are Tatiana Mulinari, Rodrigo Magnani, Antonio Juliano Ayres, Walter Leal, Marcelo Miranda, Victoria Esperanca, Odimar Zanardi, and Rejane Luvizotto. The three scientists in back are Haroldo X. L. Volpe (white shirt) Renato de Freitas and Rômulo Carvalho.

Posted on Wednesday, January 3, 2018 at 3:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Sex. Passion. And a Butterfly and Passiflora

Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae) mating. In the background  (at left) is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sex. Passion. Passionflower vine.  And by--what else--the "passion butterflies," Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae). We came across the...

Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae) mating. In the background  (at left) is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae) mating. In the background (at left) is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae) mating. In the background (at left) is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When they're mating, Gulf Fritillaries look like two different spcies. It's an orangish-reddish butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. It is as spectacular as it is showy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
When they're mating, Gulf Fritillaries look like two different spcies. It's an orangish-reddish butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. It is as spectacular as it is showy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When they're mating, Gulf Fritillaries look like two different spcies. It's an orangish-reddish butterfly with silver-spangled underwings. It is as spectacular as it is showy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating Gulf Fritillary butterflies spreading their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mating Gulf Fritillary butterflies spreading their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating Gulf Fritillary butterflies spreading their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 9, 2016 at 4:53 PM

Real Reason for Flowers? It's All About Sex

Entomologist Stephen Buchmann talks about the nests of carpenter bees at The Bee Course, an annual summer workshop in Arizona sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History.  (Photo courtesy of Robbin Thorp)

You could say that noted entomologist/author Stephen Buchmann has a thing for buds, bees, beetles and butterflies...buds that burst into flowers, and...

Entomologist Stephen Buchmann talks about the nests of carpenter bees at The Bee Course, an annual summer workshop in Arizona sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History.  (Photo courtesy of Robbin Thorp)
Entomologist Stephen Buchmann talks about the nests of carpenter bees at The Bee Course, an annual summer workshop in Arizona sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History. (Photo courtesy of Robbin Thorp)

Entomologist Stephen Buchmann talks about the nests of carpenter bees at The Bee Course, an annual summer workshop in Arizona sponsored by the American Museum of Natural History. (Photo courtesy of Robbin Thorp)

Posted on Wednesday, February 10, 2016 at 5:24 PM
Tags: bees (85), beetles (9), butterflies (77), Robbin Thorp (252), sex (4), Stephen Buchmann (5), The Reason for Flowers (1), UC Davis (230)

Monarch Population in California 'Booming'

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you missed it, you should to listen to what longtime butterfly researcher Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the...

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2015 at 5:39 PM
 
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