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Posts Tagged: nursery

Magical, Miraculous Monarch Moments

A monarch egg. Soon it will hatch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you observe a monarch butterfly laying eggs on your milkweed--and see the predators and parasitoids circling in anticipation--act fast if...

A monarch egg. Soon it will hatch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch egg. Soon it will hatch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch egg. Soon it will hatch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This larva or caterpillar has just hatched. Note the black head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This larva or caterpillar has just hatched. Note the black head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This larva or caterpillar has just hatched. Note the black head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Growing, growing, growing. Now all the caterpillar has to do is eat, eat, eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Growing, growing, growing. Now all the caterpillar has to do is eat, eat, eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Growing, growing, growing. Now all the caterpillar has to do is eat, eat, eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This third instar caterpillar rests on a leaf in its new environment. It was just removed from a lidded container--lidded to keep the milkweed leaf damp. Otherwise, it will dry out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This third instar caterpillar rests on a leaf in its new environment. It was just removed from a lidded container--lidded to keep the milkweed leaf damp. Otherwise, it will dry out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This third instar caterpillar rests on a leaf in its new environment. It was just removed from a lidded container--lidded to keep the milkweed leaf damp. Otherwise, it will dry out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three monarch caterpillars munching away on milkweed. Two of the 'cats just encountered one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Three monarch caterpillars munching away on milkweed. Two of the 'cats just encountered one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three monarch caterpillars munching away on milkweed. Two of the 'cats just encountered one another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 21, 2020 at 1:51 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Why UC Davis Campus Is Place to 'Bee' on Sept. 28

Lupine seeds will be among the native wildflower seeds available at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden plant sale on Saturday, Sept. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis campus is the place to "bee" on Saturday, Sept. 28. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's bee garden, the...

Lupine seeds will be among the native wildflower seeds available at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden plant sale on Saturday, Sept. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Lupine seeds will be among the native wildflower seeds available at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden plant sale on Saturday, Sept. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lupine seeds will be among the native wildflower seeds available at the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden plant sale on Saturday, Sept. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 26, 2019 at 4:10 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Where Are All the Monarchs? Good News and Bad News

A monarch on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) in September 2016 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Where are all the monarch butterflies? There's good news and bad news. First, the bad news: "An Epic Migration on the Verge of Collapse," wrote...

A monarch on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) in September 2016 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) in September 2016 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia) in September 2016 in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a female monarch butterfly was taken Sept. 14, 2016 in Vacaville. It was a good year for monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image of a female monarch butterfly was taken Sept. 14, 2016 in Vacaville. It was a good year for monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image of a female monarch butterfly was taken Sept. 14, 2016 in Vacaville. It was a good year for monarchs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 3, 2019 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Rain Won't Cancel Open House, Plant Sale at UC Davis Bee Garden

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be  offered at the  Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think spring. Think ceanothus. Think salvia. Think pollinators. Despite the rain forecast, the open house and plant sale at...

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be  offered at the  Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be offered at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees love ceanothus, a plant that will be offered at the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Saturday, April 7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Nursery sale on April 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, aka
A male Valley carpenter bee, aka "the teddy bear bee" or Xylocopa varipuncta, takes a liking to penstemon, a popular plant at the UC Davis Arboretum Nursery plant sale. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, aka "the teddy bear bee" or Xylocopa varipuncta, takes a liking to penstemon, a popular plant at the UC Davis Arboretum Nursery plant sale. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, April 6, 2018 at 4:37 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on March 10; Why Not Think Gaillardia?

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've been thinking about blanketing your garden with blanketflower (Gaillardia), you're in luck. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is...

A pollen-covered honey bee  forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-covered honey bee forages on a Gallardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly,  Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary butterfly, Agraulis vanillae, flutters on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, spreads its wings on a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a  hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, also called a hover fly or flower fly, stakes out a Gaillardia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinators aren't the only insects that like Gaillardia. Here a praying mantis lies in wait. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 7, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden
 
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