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Posts Tagged: nectarines

It's Tough Being a Bee During the Springlike Rains

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's tough being a bee--especially when you have work to do and the rain won't let you out of your hive. But when there's a sun break, it's...

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee pollinating a nectarine blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A foraging honey bee takes a liking to a nectarine blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2018 at 5:00 PM

All Systems Are 'Bee' for UC Davis Bee Symposium

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems are "bee" for the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium: Keeping Bees Healthy, on Saturday, March 3. Except for a little liquid...

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 5:00 PM

California summer fruit smaller and tastier this year

Drought and warm winter weather combine to reduce the size, and increase the taste, of 2015 California stonefruit.
California's summertime stonefruit - peaches, nectarines, plums, and apricots - are tending to be smaller in 2015, reported Lesley McClurg on Capital Public Radio. But don't despair. The smaller fruit is typically tastier, said a UC Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) expert.

"That smaller peach this year very likely is sweeter than the moderate-sized peach of last year," said Kevin Day, UC ANR Cooperative Extension advisor and director in Tulare and Kings counties.

Most of the change in fruit size can be attributed to the drought. When irrigation is limited, water content of the fruit diminishes and sugars become a greater proportion of the fruit mass. However, Day says drought isn't the only reason for 2015's smaller fruit size. California also had unusually warm temperatures in January and February 2015, causing fruit to ripen faster.

"A variety that might ripen after 120 days of being on a tree in a year like this ripens in only 110," Day said. "And, so it's consequently shortchanged out of 10 days of growing."

Posted on Monday, August 31, 2015 at 9:38 AM
Tags: apricots (2), Kevin Day (5), nectarines (11), peaches (17), plums (4), stonefruit (2)

UC research on dwarf fruit trees featured on local news

Rootstocks evaluated by UC scientists help control peach tree growth.
Kevin Day, a UC Cooperative Extension farm advisor for Tulare County, has been comparing the quality of fruit on stone fruit trees pruned conventionally, in hedge rows and other configurations for 17 years. Now he and his colleague Ted DeJong, UCCE specialist in the Department of Plant Sciences at UC Davis, are taking a new look at small-sized trees, reported KSEE Channel 24 news in Fresno.

The idea is keeping the fruit trees short so ladders won't be necessary for harvest and other orchard operations, while at the same time maintaining excellent yield and fruit quality.

Day talked to the KSEE news crew in a peach and nectarine orchard at the UC Kearney Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Parlier. 

"This is good news for farmers and farmworkers," said reporter Theresa Sardina. "This means safer working conditions for workers and less money out of farmers' pockets."

Day said the researchers are trying to better understand the labor savings aspect of small fruit trees, but he believes they will be proven to be significantly more cost effective.

"You can save a minimum of 25 if not up to 50 percent on any particular labor operations," Day said.

The lead agricultural technician at Kearney, Rudolfo Cisneros, was also interviewed for the story.

See the video on the KSEE Channel 24 website.

Posted on Friday, August 15, 2014 at 10:58 AM
Tags: Kevin Day (5), nectarines (11), peaches (17)

A Golden Moment

Honey bee on nectarine blossom on Presidents' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a golden moment.The honey bees that collected pollen from our nectarine trees today looked as if they were lugging gold nuggets left over from...

Honey bee on nectarine blossom on Presidents' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee on nectarine blossom on Presidents' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee on nectarine blossom on Presidents' Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With a head dusted in pollen, a honey bee works the blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
With a head dusted in pollen, a honey bee works the blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With a head dusted in pollen, a honey bee works the blossoms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollen-packing honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollen-packing honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollen-packing honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 20, 2012 at 9:02 PM
Tags: honey bees (353), nectarines (11)

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