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Posts Tagged: narrowleaf milkweed

A Monarch Named Ruth

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

When a monarch butterfly fluttered into the Davis garden of naturalist Greg Kareofelas and laid an egg on his narrowleaf milkweed, it marked the...

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Egg: Greg Kareofelas collected this egg from a narrowleaf milkweed in his Davis yard on Aug. 25. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Caterpillar: The egg that Greg Kareofelas collected Aug. 25 became a larva or caterpillar 3.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Chrysalis: The caterpillar formed a chrysalis 12.5 days later. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Adult: The monarch eclosed  only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)
The Adult: The monarch eclosed only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

The Adult: The monarch eclosed only 8.5 days after forming the chrysalis and is shown here drying its wings. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her
Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her "Ruth," after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality and women's rights. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Meet Ruth: The monarch, a female, spreads her wings. Greg named her "Ruth," after Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality and women's rights. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas)

Posted on Monday, September 21, 2020 at 4:24 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Welcome to the World of Monarchs, Greta!

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Welcome to the world of monarchs, Greta! We don't normally name the monarch butterflies we rear, but we decided that the first one reared from an...

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This monarch caterpillar was reared from an egg collected on a tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named
The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named "Greta" latches onto a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The newly eclosed monarch caterpillar named "Greta" latches onto a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia rotundiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Greta, a monarch butterfly reared from an egg, is anxious to get where she's going. And fast. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterflies start out as a near microscopic egg. This image was taken with a Canon MPE-65mm lens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

After hatching from egg to larva (caterpillar), it eats its shell and then begins munching on milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through  five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch caterpillar munches milkweed; it will go through five instars. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade-green monarch chrysalis is one of nature's jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 1, 2020 at 3:04 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

A Bee-Line Toward the Tropical Milkweed

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees just can't get enough of our tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica. We plant three species of milkweed (the host plant for...

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee forages on tropical milkweed, Asclepias curassavica, in a Vacaville pollinator garden on July 27. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee makes a beeline for the tropical milkweed,Asclepias curassavica. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee nectaring on the tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away toward the next tropical milkweed blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee takes flight, returning to her colony. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 27, 2020 at 3:47 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden
 
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