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Posts Tagged: napa

Wearing of the Green--and the Yellow

Bee hives nestled in a field of green and yellow (mustard) along Highway 12, Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

St. Patrick's Day is the "wearing of the green," but it's also the "wearing of the yellow." Wild mustard, that is.  If you drive through the...

Bee hives nestled in a field of green and yellow (mustard) along Highway 12, Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bee hives nestled in a field of green and yellow (mustard) along Highway 12, Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee hives nestled in a field of green and yellow (mustard) along Highway 12, Napa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging in mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee foraging in mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging in mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 17, 2014 at 10:13 PM
Tags: bee hives (5), mustard (13), Napa (3)

European grapevine moth found in Mendocino

As authorities collaborate on a battle plan to combat European grapevine moth, the pest has been detected in a new area.

The Santa Rosa Press Democrat reported last week that 13 moths were found in a North Ukiah chardonnay vineyard, the first evidence the pest has reached Mendocino County. The discovery of the moths means that a quarantine with a three-mile radius around the vineyard will be established.

Mendocino County Ag Commissioner Tony Linegar believes the moth was transported on winegrapes from Napa County, where infestations are high, the story said. European grapevine moth, a native of the Mediterranean region, was first detected in California's wine country last September.

Meanwhile, the Napa Valley Register reported today that USDA is forming a technical team with experts from Italy, Chile and the University of California to determine the next steps in an effort to eradicate the new pest.

Napa County Ag Commissioner Dave Whitmer, speaking to the Napa County Board of Supervisors last week, outlined a control strategy that includes additional trapping, working with growers where the pest has been found, maintaining quarantine standards and doing educational outreach, according to the article, written by Mike Treleven.

Grape industry leader Jon Ruel applauded the the efforts of the ag commissioner and UC Cooperative Extension for jumping on the issue early, Treleven reported.

“Dave (Whitmer) has done a good job to get state and federal agencies involved ... for getting money and a Technical Task Force, which drew the best scientists in the world,” Ruel was quoted.

Earlier stages of EGM larvae are tan to yellow-brown (top). Later stages are brown.
Earlier stages of EGM larvae are tan to yellow-brown (top). Later stages are brown.

Posted on Monday, May 3, 2010 at 10:51 AM

Is *suitcase smuggling* to blame for new pest?

A few of California's top vintners admit to having smuggled grapevine cane cuttings into the United States to avoid a long wait for the plant to be cleared by USDA, according to an article that moved on the Associated Press wire over the weekend. The article was published in the Fresno Bee, the New York Times and other media outlets.

Some are wondering if what reporter Tracie Cone wrote is a "winked-at act of sneaking in vines" from Europe may have also imported the European grapevine moth, an Italian pest now threatening Napa vineyards.

The deputy agricultural commissioner for Napa County, Greg Clark, expressed his frustration with the practice of suitcase smuggling.

"There are people who continue to spin their tales of smuggled plant material," Clark was quoted. "People like a story with a glass of wine, and what that tends to do is legitimize behavior that not only threatens the industry, it's illegal. Knock it off."

Director of the UC Davis Foundation Plant Services, Deborah Golino, said some of the plant virus problems in Napa may also result from smuggling.

"The more we move plants around the world, the more chance there is of introducing problems," Golino was quoted.

Other theories about how the pest came to California are swirling around, the story said. In addition to the smuggled grapevine rumors, talk has centered around imported vineyard machinery or even deliberate introduction. Since the first detection of the pest was no where near a seaport, ag officials believe it unlikely the pest was transported on a container ship.

But UC Cooperative Extension viticulture farm advisor Monica Cooper said the moth's life cycle wouldn't be conducive to suitcase smuggling.

"I'm not saying that people don't still try to get suitcase wood in, but in this instance, I'm not sure the pest would be transported like that," Cooper was quoted.

More information and photos of the European grapevine moth are available on the UC Integrated Pest Management Web site.

European grapevine moth larva feeding on berries. (Photo: M. Cooper )
European grapevine moth larva feeding on berries. (Photo: M. Cooper )

Posted on Monday, March 29, 2010 at 6:51 AM
 
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