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Posts Tagged: leafcutter bee

The Most Incredible Image of a Leafcutter Bee

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

It's one of the most beautiful, incredible images of a leafcutter bee we've ever seen. Talented macro insect photographer Donna Sanders of Emerald,...

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.
An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

An amazing image of a leafcutter bee carrying a leaf segment back to her nest. This image, used with permission, is by Donna Sanders of Emerald, Queensland, Australia.

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., on rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora, in Vacaville, Calif. The seventh annual International Pollinator Conference is set Wednesday, July 17 through Saturday, July 20 in the UC Davis Conference Center. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile spp., peers over a rock purslane petal. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 22, 2019 at 4:45 PM

International Exposure for Three UC Davis-Affiliated Photographers

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

Images by three UC Davis-affiliated photographers will be among those displayed at the international Insect Salon photography competition at the...

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)
This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)
This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a  honey bee covered with pollen from mustard.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sharing the Bounty with the Bees

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Move over, monarchs. Bees--and other pollinators--gravitate toward the enticing aroma of the milkweed, too. The milkweed is widely known as the...

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., in flight, heading toward the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., sips nectar from a milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, a green-eyed blond, sipping nectar from the milkweed.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, sipping nectar from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee leaving with pollinia (pollen structure) from the milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 at 5:25 PM

Bad Day for a Bee

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It was a good day to be a praying mantis. It was not a good day to be a honey bee. Just before noon today, we watched a green praying mantis lurking...

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis snares a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee targets the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The leafcutter bee nearly slams into the mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis keeps eating. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis polishes off the last morsel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 1, 2014 at 4:22 PM
Tags: honey bee (196), leafcutter bee (12), praying mantis (85)

Katydids in My Yard?

A few weeks ago I was out admiring my daylilies and noticed what, at first glance I thought was a mantid.  Excitedly I ran for my camera.  However, as soon as I began to really look at my "mantid" I became suspicious.  The forelegs weren't those I expected.  And, hold on, those were definitely the legs of a jumper!  So what I really had was either a katydid or a grasshopper.  I was not nearly as happy as I had been a few moments before.

In doing a little research, I learned that the true katydid (Tettiginiidae) is a relative of the grasshopper, but not actually a grasshopper.  The katydid is green, grows to 2 or more inches in length and has oval-shaped wings and long black-and-white antennae.  It lives where there are lots of trees and shrubs, which provide its food, preferably deciduous trees, and especially oaks.  The eggs hatch in the spring and the katydid goes through several molts, becoming more and more adult with each molt.  Interestingly, while they can fly they do so only for short distances, preferring to walk or climb to reach their next meal.

Well, my little specimen was in our front yard directly under our Valley Oak (Quercus lobata) and fit every description of a katydid--except that I could not really identify its oval wings.  So, what to do?

In checking the UC IPM website, I learned that in a healthy garden parasites will attack the katydid eggs, thereby keeping them under control.  Clearly I don't have an infestation, so I guess I'll let nature take its course.

Oh, and by the way, a few days later I noticed several carefully scalloped leaves on the roses in my back yard.  Hmmm....could that katydid have been feasting on a few things besides the oak! (Actually this turned out to be leaf utter bee "damage". Leafcutter bees are beneficial insects.)

 

Resources

http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/true_katydid.htm

Wikipedia (grasshoppers)

www.ipm.ucdavis.edu

Katydid. (Photos by Marian Chmieleski)
Katydid. (Photos by Marian Chmieleski)

Beneficial leafcutter bee
Beneficial leafcutter bee "damage".

Posted on Tuesday, July 2, 2013 at 3:53 PM
Tags: damage (5), grasshopper (2), Katydid (7), leafcutter bee (12)

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