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Posts Tagged: lavender

Nighty-Night, Mr. Bumble Bee!

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a bumble bee sleeping? If you slip out to your garden at night or early morning, you might find the male bumble bees asleep in,...

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, sleeps on a Mexican sunflower,Bombus Bombus vosnesenskii,in Vacaville,Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clings to lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Holding tight is this sleeping male yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, clutching a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 20, 2020 at 5:05 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

Good Morning from a Sleepy Bumble Bee

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, commonly known as a

Benjamin Franklin reportedly said: "Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy, and wise." What about the sleeping patterns of...

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, commonly known as a
A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, commonly known as a "black-tailed bumble bee," awakens on a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, commonly known as a "black-tailed bumble bee," awakens on a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Good morning! The Bombus melanopygus peers over a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Good morning! The Bombus melanopygus peers over a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Good morning! The Bombus melanopygus peers over a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to forage! The Bombus melanopygus peers investigages a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to forage! The Bombus melanopygus peers investigages a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to forage! The Bombus melanopygus peers investigages a Spanish lavender in a Vacaville park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 at 4:52 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

What's for Dinner? How About a Green Bottle Fly?

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? A crab spider, camouflaged in our lavender patch, didn't catch a honey bee, a butterfly, an ant or a syrphid fly. No, it nailed...

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 at 4:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

Lovin' the Lavender

The six-acre lavender fields on the Araceli Farms, on the outskirts of Dixon, glow during the Lavender Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lovin' the lavender... If you attended the Lavender Festival last weekend at the six-acre Araceli Farms at 7389 Pitt School Road, Dixon, you were in...

The six-acre lavender fields on the Araceli Farms, on the outskirts of Dixon, glow during the Lavender Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The six-acre lavender fields on the Araceli Farms, on the outskirts of Dixon, glow during the Lavender Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The six-acre lavender fields on the Araceli Farms, on the outskirts of Dixon, glow during the Lavender Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Araceli Farms are planted with seven varieties of lavender: seven varieties of lavender: Grosso, Provence, White Spike, Royal Velvet, Violet Intrigue, Folgate, and Melissa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Araceli Farms are planted with seven varieties of lavender: seven varieties of lavender: Grosso, Provence, White Spike, Royal Velvet, Violet Intrigue, Folgate, and Melissa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Araceli Farms are planted with seven varieties of lavender: seven varieties of lavender: Grosso, Provence, White Spike, Royal Velvet, Violet Intrigue, Folgate, and Melissa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Cordovan honey bee, the color of pure gold, takes flight through the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Cordovan honey bee, the color of pure gold, takes flight through the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Cordovan honey bee, the color of pure gold, takes flight through the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Clay's Bees--Clay Ford, owner of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, Vacaville--pollinate the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Clay's Bees--Clay Ford, owner of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, Vacaville--pollinate the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Clay's Bees--Clay Ford, owner of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, Vacaville--pollinate the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A variegated meadowhawk (Sympetrum corruptum)in the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A variegated meadowhawk (Sympetrum corruptum)in the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A variegated meadowhawk (Sympetrum corruptum)in the lavender fields. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western pondhawk (Erythemis collocate) rests on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western pondhawk (Erythemis collocate) rests on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western pondhawk (Erythemis collocate) rests on a lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) flutters around the lavender fields of the Araceli Farms in Dixon on June 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) flutters around the lavender fields of the Araceli Farms in Dixon on June 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A painted lady butterfly (Vanessa cardui) flutters around the lavender fields of the Araceli Farms in Dixon on June 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Maria Gonzalez of Dixon cuts lavender on the Araceli Farms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Maria Gonzalez of Dixon cuts lavender on the Araceli Farms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Maria Gonzalez of Dixon cuts lavender on the Araceli Farms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the curved knife, perfect for lavender harvesting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the curved knife, perfect for lavender harvesting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the curved knife, perfect for lavender harvesting. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors at the Lavender Festival at Araceli Farms stroll through the vendor area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Visitors at the Lavender Festival at Araceli Farms stroll through the vendor area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors at the Lavender Festival at Araceli Farms stroll through the vendor area. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 24, 2019 at 4:20 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Family, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Bee and the Butterfly

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in our pollinator garden. It is all alone--for a little white. Then...

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 1, 2018 at 4:42 PM
Tags: Agraulis vanillae (73), Art Shapiro (218), catmint (16), Gulf Fritillary (53), honey bees (373), lavender (30), UC Davis (228)
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Yard & Garden

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