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Posts Tagged: lacewings

Lacewings! Lacewings! Lacewings!

A green lacewing lands on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There it was. A beautiful green lacewing, family Chrysopidae, resting on a yellow Iceland poppy in our bee garden. It literally glowed. Nice to have...

A green lacewing lands on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A green lacewing lands on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A green lacewing lands on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Membranous wings of the green lacewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Membranous wings of the green lacewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Membranous wings of the green lacewing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This lacewing was checking its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This lacewing was checking its surroundings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This lacewing was checking its surroundings.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 12, 2015 at 5:36 PM
Tags: Chrysopidae (2), garden (66), green lacewings (2), lacewings (3), UC IPM (38)

The Good Guys--and Girls!

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think of them as "the good guys" and "the good girls." Insects such as lacewings, lady beetles and flower flies. We're delighted to see that the...

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, nectaring on a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lacewing glows in the afternoon sun. Larvae eat such soft-bodied insects as mealybugs, psyllids, thrips, mites, whiteflies, aphids, small caterpillars, leafhoppers, and insect eggs, according to the UC IPM website. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lady beetle, aka ladybug, is well known for its voracious appetite of aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 11, 2014 at 10:11 PM
Tags: Claire Kremen (11), flower flies (6), hover flies (6), lacewings (3), lady bugs (7), syprhids (1), UC IPM (38), Xerces Society (31)

Favoring the Fava Beans

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, prowling on a fava bean leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

People aren't the only ones favoring fava beans. Fava beans growing in a raised bed in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology...

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, prowling on a fava bean leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, prowling on a fava bean leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, prowling on a fava bean leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasp on the hunt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasp on the hunt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasp on the hunt. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging on a fava bean blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee foraging on a fava bean blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee foraging on a fava bean blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female Valley carpenter bee robbing nectar by slitting the corolla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female Valley carpenter bee robbing nectar by slitting the corolla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female Valley carpenter bee robbing nectar by slitting the corolla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 5, 2013 at 9:38 PM
 
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