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Posts Tagged: gulf fritillaries

Insect Wedding Photography-- Or How a Tired Ol' Male Proved He Wasn't

A newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) hanging from her empty chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're heard these idioms: The early bird gets the worm First come, first served. Johnny-on-the-spot. The second mouse gets the cheese. But...

A newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) hanging from her empty chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) hanging from her empty chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) hanging from her empty chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tired old male, his wings tattered and torn, is the first to arrive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tired old male, his wings tattered and torn, is the first to arrive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tired old male, his wings tattered and torn, is the first to arrive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The action at the
The action at the "altar": the newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary and the tired old male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The action at the "altar": the newly eclosed female Gulf Fritillary and the tired old male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillary butterflies become one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two Gulf Fritillary butterflies become one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two Gulf Fritillary butterflies become one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 4, 2018 at 5:10 PM

A Two-Headed Butterfly?

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's an old joke circulating among entomologists about excited novices contacting them about finding a "two-headed butterfly." Sounds like...

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae)on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 4:39 PM

Butterfly Summit Features UC Davis Expert Art Shapiro

A male monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How's the butterfly population faring in north-central California? What do you plant to attract and sustain them? You can find out at the second...

A male monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist and author Sal Levinson speaks at the inaugural Butterfly Summit. Seated next to her is Tora Rocha, founder of the Pollinator Posse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist and author Sal Levinson speaks at the inaugural Butterfly Summit. Seated next to her is Tora Rocha, founder of the Pollinator Posse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist and author Sal Levinson speaks at the inaugural Butterfly Summit. Seated next to her is Tora Rocha, founder of the Pollinator Posse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was the scene at the first-ever Butterfly Summit at Anne's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This was the scene at the first-ever Butterfly Summit at Anne's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This was the scene at the first-ever Butterfly Summit at Anne's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 2:03 PM

California Wild Fires Raging...but Life Cycles Go On...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As those horrendous wild fires continue to rage throughout California, as Cal Fire helicopters roar over, as residents scramble from their...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Insect Wedding Photography: When Three's a Crowd

Insect wedding photography on the passion flower vine: male and female Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So there they were, the bride and groom, culminating their vows. We spotted them in Vacaville, Calif., clinging to a passion flower vine...

Insect wedding photography on the passion flower vine: male and female Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Insect wedding photography on the passion flower vine: male and female Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Insect wedding photography on the passion flower vine: male and female Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When two's company and three's a crowd: a male Gulf Fritillary zeroes in on the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
When two's company and three's a crowd: a male Gulf Fritillary zeroes in on the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When two's company and three's a crowd: a male Gulf Fritillary zeroes in on the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three is still a crowd. The two Gulf Frits have an univited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Three is still a crowd. The two Gulf Frits have an univited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three is still a crowd. The two Gulf Frits have an univited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three Gulf Fritillaries: two males and a female. One is an uninvited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Three Gulf Fritillaries: two males and a female. One is an uninvited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Three Gulf Fritillaries: two males and a female. One is an uninvited guest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 6, 2017 at 4:44 PM

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