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Posts Tagged: green

What's for Dinner? Drama on a Sunflower Blossom

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? If you're a praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, perched on a sunflower, sometimes it can be a long wait....

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, spreads out across a sunflower blossom in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gotcha! The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, snags what appears to be a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis nymph,  Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The praying mantis nymph, Stagmomantis limbata, finishing dinner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2020 at 3:50 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Food, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

The Emerald Ash Borer Doesn't Just Target Ash Trees

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

The emerald ash borer, a wood-boring beetle native to northeastern Asia and now invasive in much of the United States, doesn't just target ash...

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)
Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

Wright State biology professor Don Cipollini earlier discovered that the emerald green ash borer targets the white fringetree, Chionanthus virginicus, native to the savannas and lowlands of the southeastern United States. Later he and fellow researchers discovered it also infests an olive tree species. (Photo by Chris Snyder)

Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)
Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)

Larva of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. (Photo courtesy of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources)

Posted on Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 6:10 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

What's for Dinner? How About a Green Bottle Fly?

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? A crab spider, camouflaged in our lavender patch, didn't catch a honey bee, a butterfly, an ant or a syrphid fly. No, it nailed...

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 at 4:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Environment, Health, Yard & Garden

When Irish Eyes Are Smiling...There Must Be a Green Insect Nearby

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When Irish eyes are smiling, it could be... St. Patrick's Day is approaching or A green insect is nearby  If you've ever seen the female...

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The female metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, nectaring on a purple coneflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male metallic green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, is partly green; its head and thorax are green, but not its abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on a seaside daisy (Erigeron glaucus) at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 15, 2019 at 7:18 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Find the Green Darner

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the green darner. Trying to spot the green darner dragonfly, Anax junius--so named because of its resemblance to a darning needle--is like...

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

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