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Posts Tagged: graduate students

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Something Wonderful Is Happening Saturday, Jan. 18 at Bohart Museum of Entomology! If you're a student and thinking about a science career, this is...

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Zachary Griebenow, shown here at UC Davis Picnic Day, will present his research on ants at the Bohart Museum of Entomology open house. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alexander Dedmon is enthusiastic about his research. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Doctoral Yao Cai (left) (shown here with undergraduate student Christopher Ocoa, will discuss his circadian clock research on fruit flies and monarch butterflies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.
Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Charlotte Alberts studies assassin flies and also draws them! This is an Ommatius amula with prey.

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologist Crystal Homicz will talk about bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart Museum Open House: What Insects Do Bats Eat?

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you watch bats emerge at dusk in the summer from the Yolo Causeway, have you ever wondered what insects they eat? UC Davis doctoral candidate...

Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats leaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed batsleaving Yolo Causeway at dusk on Sept. 10, 2019. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mexican free-tailed bats ready to catch insects at the Yolo Causeway. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Thousands of bats nest in the Yolo Causeway during the summer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)
This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

This is an image of a bat that Ann Holmes studies. (Photo by Shayan Kaveh)

Bumble Bees on the Move

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bumble bees stole the show during the Graduate Student Poster Research Competition at the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium, themed "Keeping Bees...

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 
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