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Posts Tagged: genus

UC Davis Professor Jason Bond Publishes Trapdoor Spider Research (And Appears on TV)

This is a female Cryptocteniza kawtak, discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Photo by Jason Bond)

It's out. The long-awaited scientific article on the new trapdoor genus (and species) that UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered on a sandy beach...

This is a female Cryptocteniza kawtak, discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Photo by Jason Bond)
This is a female Cryptocteniza kawtak, discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Photo by Jason Bond)

This is a female Cryptocteniza kawtak, discovered by UC Davis professor Jason Bond at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Photo by Jason Bond)

A screen shot of the TV program, Good Day Sacramento, featuring Jason Bond, the trapdoor spider he discovered, and the name-that-species contest.  See https://gooddaysacramento.cbslocal.com/video/4770491-name-that-spider/
A screen shot of the TV program, Good Day Sacramento, featuring Jason Bond, the trapdoor spider he discovered, and the name-that-species contest. See https://gooddaysacramento.cbslocal.com/video/4770491-name-that-spider/

A screen shot of the TV program, Good Day Sacramento, featuring Jason Bond, the trapdoor spider he discovered, and the name-that-species contest. See https://gooddaysacramento.cbslocal.com/video/4770491-name-that-spider/

Posted on Wednesday, October 7, 2020 at 2:52 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

UC Davis Spider-Naming Contest: We Have a Winner!

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

Remember when UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spider on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park,...

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the species,Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the species, Cryptocteniza kawtak. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis Professor Jason Bond discovered the new genus and species of a trapdoor spider. (Illustration by Jason Bond)

UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a
UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a "proud Aggie," surveys the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs; this is Penn State's research farm. She holds a doctorate in entomology from Penn State.

UC Davis alumnus Kirsten Pearsons, a "proud Aggie," surveys the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs; this is Penn State's research farm. She holds a doctorate in entomology from Penn State.

Posted on Monday, September 28, 2020 at 5:41 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Name That Spider--And Did They Ever!

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

When UC Davis Professor Jason Bond  discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders in Monterey County and issued a call for folks to name...

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)
This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is male of the species of a new genus of trapdoor spiders that UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered in Monterey County. Bond proposes to name the genus, Cryptocteniza, part of which means “hidden or secret.” (Image by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)
This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

This is where UC Davis professor Jason Bond discovered a new genus of trapdoor spiders. (Illustrations by Jason Bond)

Posted on Friday, June 5, 2020 at 4:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Natural Resources

Name That Spider!

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

Name that spider!  UC Davis professor Jason Bond is seeking a species name for a new genus of trapdoor spiders he discovered on a sandy beach...

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza.  (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 4:42 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Hear That Buzz on the Red Hot Poker?

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On the last few days of Year 2019, where do you find a foraging honey bee? Well, if the temperature soars to 50 or 55, you might see honey bees slip...

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads for a winter flowering plant, Kniphofia, in Napa, on Saturday, Dec. 28. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker  (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Check out the pollen on the honey bee foraging on a red hot poker (genus Kniphofia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A clump of
A clump of "red hot poker" or "Christmas cheer" (genus Kniphofia) brings winter cheer to a Napa vineyard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A clump of "red hot poker" or "Christmas cheer" (genus Kniphofia) brings winter cheer to a Napa vineyard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 31, 2019 at 3:49 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden
 
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