Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: fire

Beekeepers Among Those Benefiting from Vacaville Fire Art Project

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled

Some lost everything: Their homes, their barns, their farm animals, their bees, their livelihoods. The recent wildfire that roared through...

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled
Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

Artist Lisa Rico painted this photo of lavender and bees for the Vacaville Fire Art Project she founded. It's titled "Making Honey" and was purchased by Andrea Hofmann-Miller. Among fire victims were beekeepers and Girl on the Hill Boutique Vineyard and Lavender.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting,
A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A honey bee buzzes over a sunflower in this painting, "Sun-Bee" by Lisa Rico for the Vacaville Fire Art Project. This one was purchased by Tiffany Murdaca.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled
A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

A lady beetle, aka ladybug, climbs the stalk of a sunflower in this painting by Lisa Rico, founder of the Vacaville Fire Art Project. It's titled "Sun's Going to Shine Again" and was purchased by Aumrey Moland.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled
Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

Honey bees forage in a field of lavender in this painting, titled "Honey Makers," by Lisa Rico. It was sold to Joie Moralde, with proceeds benefitting fire victims.

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled
A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

A monarch butterfly flutters through a field of lavender. Painting by Lisa Rico. This one is titled "Monarch Muse."

Posted on Friday, September 25, 2020 at 3:21 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Yard & Garden

What Do Honey Bee Colonies Do During a Raging Wildfire?

Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, lost some 500 hives during the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)

What do honey bee colonies do when a raging wildfire heads straight toward their hives (bee boxes)? No, the bees do not abscond with their queen and...

Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, lost some 500 hives during the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)
Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, lost some 500 hives during the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)

Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, lost some 500 hives during the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)

Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, checks her losses in the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)
Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, checks her losses in the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)

Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens, checks her losses in the Aug. 19 Vacaville fire. (Photo by Caroline Yelle)

Dead brood and dying bees are in the half-burned hives belonging to Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo by Carolyn Yelle)
Dead brood and dying bees are in the half-burned hives belonging to Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo by Carolyn Yelle)

Dead brood and dying bees are in the half-burned hives belonging to Caroline Yelle, owner of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo by Carolyn Yelle)

Beekeeper Rick Schubert, who lost his farm and bees in the Aug. 19th Vacaville fire, provided the bees for UC Davis professor Norm Gary's research and bee wrangling for more than 30 years. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beekeeper Rick Schubert, who lost his farm and bees in the Aug. 19th Vacaville fire, provided the bees for UC Davis professor Norm Gary's research and bee wrangling for more than 30 years. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Rick Schubert, who lost his farm and bees in the Aug. 19th Vacaville fire, provided the bees for UC Davis professor Norm Gary's research and bee wrangling for more than 30 years. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 31, 2020 at 4:53 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Health, Innovation, Natural Resources

The Heartbreaking Story of a Bee Scientist Who Lost Everything

A wall of fire races toward Quail Canyon Road, home of Caroline Yelle's business, Pope Canyon Queens.

It's heartbreaking. Beyond heartbreaking. Caroline Yelle, 28, owner of Pope Canyon Queens (PCQ) at 8307 Quail Canyon Road Quail Canyon Road,...

A wall of fire races toward Quail Canyon Road, home of Caroline Yelle's business, Pope Canyon Queens.
A wall of fire races toward Quail Canyon Road, home of Caroline Yelle's business, Pope Canyon Queens.

A wall of fire races toward Quail Canyon Road, home of Caroline Yelle's business, Pope Canyon Queens.

Smoke covers the landscape and the hives of Pope Canyon Queens on Quail Canyon Road. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)
Smoke covers the landscape and the hives of Pope Canyon Queens on Quail Canyon Road. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Smoke covers the landscape and the hives of Pope Canyon Queens on Quail Canyon Road. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Destruction: The farm at 8307 Quail Canyon Road gone. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)
Destruction: The farm at 8307 Quail Canyon Road gone. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Destruction: The farm at 8307 Quail Canyon Road gone. (Photo courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Burned hives of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo Courtesy of Caroline Yelle)
Burned hives of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo Courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Burned hives of Pope Canyon Queens. (Photo Courtesy of Caroline Yelle)

Posted on Wednesday, August 26, 2020 at 2:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Clay's Bees: The Bees, They're Gone

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

The bees, they're gone. Beekeeper Clay Ford, who owns the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as "Clay's Bees," is devastated. The...

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Fire rages towards Clay's Bees during the Vacaville Fire. (Image courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)
Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

Melted honeycomb from the hives of Clay's Bees, Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville. (Photo courtesy of Paul Kuroda, used with permission)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)
These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are some of the bee hives that Clay Ford of the Pleasants Valley Honey Company, also known as Clay's Bees, lost to the Vacaville Fire. (Photo from YouTube video, Pleasants Valley Agricultural Association)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These are Clay's Bees at a lavender farm in nearby Dixon. This image was taken in June 2019 during Lavender Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Vacaville Fire roared down these hills onto the Pleasants Valley Road area where Clay Ford kept his bees. This photo was taken Monday afternoon, Aug. 24, re a road-access permit issued by Lt. Jon Mazer of the Solano County Sheriff's Department. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2020 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation, Yard & Garden

To prepare Californians for wildfire in oak woodlands, UC ANR offers teachers training

Students from the Say Yuba Environmental Science (YES) Charter Academy modeled wildfire in oak woodlands at a workshop held before the coronavirus pandemic.

California's most destructive wildfire year on record was 2018, with devastating fires occurring in Northern California oak woodlands. From 2015 to 2017, six of California's 20 most deadly and destructive fires in history occurred in these areas. The communities living in oak woodlands, which had been mostly spared from previous wildfires, were largely unprepared.

To prepare Californians to live with wildfire, Kate Wilkin, former UC Cooperative Extension forestry/fire science and natural resources advisor, and UC Sierra Foothill Research and Extension Center and Hopland Research and Extension Center community educators Alexandra Stefancich and Hannah Bird received a $100,000 Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Education grant.

In addition to delivering community workshops, the educators will offer online training for teachers this summer. The curriculum will be introduced by webinar on Tuesday, July 14, from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (PDT). Register online for this free webinar at https://bit.ly/firecurriculum.

“The goal of this project is to educate youth and adults about their natural ecosystems and how to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire,” Stefancich said.

Even before the current COVID-19 pandemic constrained activities, challenges arose: the federal government shutdown delayed the grant; a wildfire burned approximately two-thirds of the Hopland REC; Wilkin moved on from UCCE and Rebecca Ozeran, UCCE livestock and natural resources advisor, took over leading the wildfire education project.

Teachers practiced delivering lessons from the FireWorks Oak Woodlands curriculum at a training held before the coronavirus pandemic.

Training kids, adults and communities

The team is educating children, adults and communities. Their three-pronged approach includes youth education for 500 middle school students and training for teachers; adult education through advanced training for California Naturalists; and community education by partnering with Fire Safe Councils in Butte, Mendocino and Yuba counties.

“One of the most exciting aspects of this grant has been the youth fire education component,” Bird said. “The grant has funded an adaptation of theUS Forest Service's FireWorks Curriculum – first modeled for Rocky Mountains forests – to the California oak woodland ecosystem. This hands-on, place-based science curriculum aims to provide students an in-depth understanding of fire science. In working on this curriculum, the team wants to highlight the importance of not only oak woodland fire science, but the cultural history associated with fire on these landscapes.”

The grant allowed the team to work with local representatives from the Hopland Band of Pomo Indians, Kashia Band of Pomo Indians, United Auburn Indian Community and the Nevada City Rancheria to develop lessons shaped by the cultural value of fire as a tool and the long relationship between people and fire in California.

While developing the lessons, the team realized the importance of trauma-informed educational practices.

“Just five years ago, we often talked about wildfire theoretically, but now every student I speak with has their own experience to share,” Bird said. “It is important to give time in the lessons for the trauma experienced by our youth, and to educate them and encourage a sense of agency. These lessons focus on the positive! We don't spend time on things that we cannot change. We learn crucial concepts of fire science and build on them to make our schools, families and communities more fire prepared.”

Feelings about fire

The team piloted the new curriculum with more than 150 middle school students in Redwood Valley and Ukiah, just before schools closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Trialing the curriculum with students was really valuable,” Bird said. “These students have seen their communities affected by wildfire and it brings up many emotions for them.”

Students were asked to share their thoughts around fire at the beginning of the lessons and again at the end of the lesson series. Feelings of fear were replaced with feeling prepared and confident.

Before the lessons, students' comments about fire included, “Scary because I live in the mountains and my house is there, it could burn down.”

After the lessons, their comments included, “I felt positive about this, I feel that I know what to do, I think everyone should know how to prepare for fire.”

Pomolita Middle School students made an action plan for their school to help improve school fire preparedness. Students had hoped to present their plans to school administrators, but school closures due to the coronavirus crisis have delayed the presentation.

“Most of what we found at Pomolita school was really positive – the students do have a few suggestions that they hoped to share with the school administration,” Bird said. “Students also made an emergency contact plan and planned what they would like to have in a go bag for themselves and for their pets.”

Community educator Stefancich added, “This curriculum, aimed at middle school students, is ideal for any educator hoping to provide their students with more insight about the role fire plays in the ecosystem and how they can prepare for its eventuality. Each lesson is set up for the lay educator to be able to teach, so even without advanced fire knowledge it will be easy to use.”

The team continues to adapt the FireWorks curriculum for oak woodlands and expects it to be available at the FireWorks site https://www.frames.gov/fireworks/curriculum/overview by the fall. 

 

While the UCCE team was developing its fire workshop curriculum, the Mendocino Complex Fire burned two-thirds of the Hopland REC in 2018.
Posted on Thursday, June 11, 2020 at 8:36 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Family, Health, Natural Resources

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu