Capitol Corridor
University of California
Capitol Corridor

Posts Tagged: crickets

UC Davis Design, Entomology Students to Showcase 'The World of Insects' at Art Exhibition June 6

Graphic design examples by UC Davis student Emily Liu comprise her business system revolving around crickets:

Take the creative and collaborative minds of students studying design and entomology at the University of California, Davis. Add an innovative...

Graphic design examples by UC Davis student Emily Liu comprise her business system revolving around crickets:
Graphic design examples by UC Davis student Emily Liu comprise her business system revolving around crickets: "Chirpies."

Graphic design examples by UC Davis student Emily Liu comprise her business system revolving around crickets: "Chirpies."

Silkscreen work hanging on a wire. It will be displayed June 6 at an art exhibit from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Environmental Horticulture courtyard.
Silkscreen work hanging on a wire. It will be displayed June 6 at an art exhibit from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Environmental Horticulture courtyard.

Silkscreen work hanging on a wire. It will be displayed June 6 at an art exhibit from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Environmental Horticulture courtyard.

Demonstrating the silkscreen process are Gale Okumura (back) and Diane Ullman, partially seen.
Demonstrating the silkscreen process are Gale Okumura (back) and Diane Ullman, partially seen.

Demonstrating the silkscreen process are Gale Okumura (back) and Diane Ullman, partially seen.

Posted on Monday, June 4, 2018 at 2:11 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Food Health Innovation

What's Wrong With This Picture?

What's wrong with this picture? This is not a field cricket but a house cricket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Take a look at the insect below. "It's a cricket," you say. Correct. It is a cricket. But it doesn't belong there. Why? It's the wrong cricket....

What's wrong with this picture? This is not a field cricket but a house cricket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
What's wrong with this picture? This is not a field cricket but a house cricket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's wrong with this picture? This is not a field cricket but a house cricket. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a cricket sharing the same blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee and a cricket sharing the same blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee and a cricket sharing the same blanket flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 8, 2015 at 10:36 AM

Can crickets be the new beef?

UC ANR's Mark Lundy says some of the sustainability claims on production of insects for human food have been overstated. (Photo: Kathy Keatley Garvey)
As the world strives to feed its growing population, some have suggested insects could be an environmentally friendly alternative protein source for people. However, research by UC Agriculture and Natural Resources experts on crickets found they don't have the potential to add much protein to the diet after all, reported Mandy Oaklander on Time.com.

For the study, published in the journal PLOS One, the researchers raised crickets on five different diets - corn, soy, grain, food waste and crop residue. They measured the crickets' size and how much edible protein they produced.

“I think the sustainability claims on this topic have been overstated given the current state of knowledge,” wrote UC ANR Cooperative Extension agronomy advisor Mark Lundy in an e-mail to Time. “I'm all for exploring alternatives, and I am impressed by the amount of innovation that has sprung up around insect cultivation and cuisine in the last few years. However, I also think we need to be clear-eyed about what the sustainability gains are and aren't, and focus our innovative efforts and limited resources to where they will have the most lasting impact.”

Lundy conducted the research and published the results with horticultural entomologist Michael Parrella, a professor and chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. The story generated a great deal of news media coverage, including:

The environmental benefits of eating crickets vs. chicken: It's complicated
Brooke Borel, Popular Science, April 22

Humans Are Ready For Protein-Rich Crickets, But Are Crickets Ready For Us?
Rex Macadangdang, Tech Times, April 19

Crickets can't replace Meat in Human Diet: Study
Luis Georg, Perfect Science, April 18

Turns out, crickets may not be the solution to all of our problems
Lindsay Abrams, Salon, April 17

Crickets aren't ready to replace meat
Pat Bailey, Futurity.org, April 17

Crickets aren't the miracle source of protein
Kathy Keatley Garvey, Phys.org, April 16

Crickets Aren't the Superfood They're Cracked Up to Be
Alissa Walker, Gizmodo.com, April 16

Maybe crickets aren't the food of the future, after all 
Alexis Madrigal, Fusion.net, April 16

Crickets Alone Will Not Save You, Futurist Foodies Robbie Gonzalez, i09/We Come From the Future, April 20

Crickets Are Not a Free Lunch
Entomology Today, April 15

Posted on Friday, April 24, 2015 at 10:55 AM
Tags: crickets (4), Mark Lundy (2)

Have a Few Crickets With Your K├Âlsch

Would you eat  honey bee larvae? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These things go together: Ham and eggs, macaroni and cheese, and beer and bugs. Beer and bugs? Definitely! Haven't you ever had a few crickets with...

Would you eat  honey bee larvae? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Would you eat honey bee larvae? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Would you eat honey bee larvae? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wax moth larvae: good source of protein? And throw in a few small hive beetles for good measure? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wax moth larvae: good source of protein? And throw in a few small hive beetles for good measure? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wax moth larvae: good source of protein? And throw in a few small hive beetles for good measure?(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: kmchurchill@ucanr.edu