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Posts Tagged: biology

Name That Spider!

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

Name that spider!  UC Davis professor Jason Bond is seeking a species name for a new genus of trapdoor spiders he discovered on a sandy beach...

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the female of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza.  (Image by Jason Bond)
This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

This is the male of the new genus, Cryptocteniza. (Image by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)
UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

UC Davis professor Jason Bond found the genus on a sandy beach at Moss Landing State Park, Monterey County. (Illustration provided by Jason Bond)

Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 4:42 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources

Geoffrey Attardo's Landmark Research on Genomics of Tsetse Flies

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You probably don't think much about the blood-sucking tsetse fly--unless you're living in Africa or are planning to travel there. But if you're UC...

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, September 13, 2019 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Economic Development, Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management

Deadly Citrus Greening Disease: A Better Lure for Asian Citrus Psyllids

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and  Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

If you like or grow citrus, you ought to be worried about the worldwide threat of the deadly citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing or HLB) caused by...

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and  Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.
UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (center) examines a lure in Mogi Mirin, São Paulo on Brazil’s Independence Day (Sept. 7) with Haroldo Volpe (far right) and Renato de Freitas, both of Fundecitrus.

Posted on Monday, September 9, 2019 at 7:09 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Food, Innovation, Natural Resources, Pest Management, Yard & Garden

UC Davis Bee Classes Are 'The Bees' Knees'

A student in the UC Davis class,

If you want to bee-come a beekeeper, bee scientists at the University of California at Davis will oblige. Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro...

A student in the UC Davis class,
A student in the UC Davis class, "Planning Ahead for Your First Hive," holds a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A student in the UC Davis class, "Planning Ahead for Your First Hive," holds a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a frame. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño opens a hive as the students gather around. (Photo by Kathy Katley Garvey)
Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño opens a hive as the students gather around. (Photo by Kathy Katley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Elina Lastro Niño opens a hive as the students gather around. (Photo by Kathy Katley Garvey)

Participants in the UC Davis class,
Participants in the UC Davis class, "Planning for Your First Hive," learn about the top bar hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Participants in the UC Davis class, "Planning for Your First Hive," learn about the top bar hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis research assistant Bernardo Niño examines a frame. He is the educational supervisor for the California Master Beekeeper Program, which conducts bee classes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis research assistant Bernardo Niño examines a frame. He is the educational supervisor for the California Master Beekeeper Program, which conducts bee classes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis research assistant Bernardo Niño examines a frame. He is the educational supervisor for the California Master Beekeeper Program, which conducts bee classes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hive in the foreground is teeming with bees. In the background, students in a UC Davis class learn about bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A hive in the foreground is teeming with bees. In the background, students in a UC Davis class learn about bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A hive in the foreground is teeming with bees. In the background, students in a UC Davis class learn about bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 29, 2019 at 5:52 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture, Economic Development, Environment, Health, Innovation

Golden Orbweavers Ignore Biological Rules

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Size does matter. Have you ever wondered about sexual size dimorphism in the tropical spiders, the golden orbweavers? The females are sometimes 10...

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)
A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Posted on Thursday, June 20, 2019 at 4:36 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment, Innovation, Natural Resources
 
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