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Posts Tagged: UC Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program

The Butterfly and the Bee

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a strikingly beautiful insect. But in its larval stage, the alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme--also known as the orange sulphur butterfly--is...

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, sips nectar from an African blue basil blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee shadows an alfalfa butterfly, Colias eurytheme, on African blue basil. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two can get along: the alfalfa butterfly and the honey bee. In its larval stage, this butterfly is a pest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Redhumped Caterpillar: Aptly Named

Redhumped caterpillars on a Western redbud tree in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How appropriate are many of the common names of insects! Take the immature form (caterpillar) of the moth, Schizura concinna, family...

Redhumped caterpillars on a Western redbud tree in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Redhumped caterpillars on a Western redbud tree in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Redhumped caterpillars on a Western redbud tree in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Skeltonized redbud leaf--damage done by a redhumped caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Skeltonized redbud leaf--damage done by a redhumped caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Skeltonized redbud leaf--damage done by a redhumped caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Western redbud blooming in April. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee nectaring on a Western redbud blooming in April. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee nectaring on a Western redbud blooming in April. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What This Katydid Did...

Who goes there? That would be a katydid peeking out between yellow rose petals. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's not a question of whether katydid did or didn't. She did. In answer to...

Who goes there? That would be a katydid peeking out between yellow rose petals. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Who goes there? That would be a katydid peeking out between yellow rose petals. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Who goes there? That would be a katydid peeking out between yellow rose petals. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green katydid cannot camouflage itself on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The green katydid cannot camouflage itself on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The green katydid cannot camouflage itself on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A katydid tunnels into a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bottoms up! A katydid tunnels into a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A katydid tunnels into a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at 5:33 PM

Ladybug, Ladybug, Fly Away Home!

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised  for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ladybug!  Ladybug!Fly away home.Your house is on fireAnd your children are gone. How many times have you heard that nursery rhyme? Better yet,...

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised  for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle positions itself on a tropical milkweed leaf, poised for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems go! The lady beetle opens its elytra, revealing its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready for liftoff? This lady beetle is good to go. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And we're off! The lady beetle spreads its wings and is off. Photos taken with 105mm lens on Nikon D500; ISO 2000; shutter speed, 1/1000, and f-stop 16. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 14, 2017 at 5:00 PM

An Insect Assembled by a Committee?

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an insect that looks as if it were assembled by a dysfunctional committee: long angular legs,  long antennae, and beady eyes on a thin...

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 at 5:15 PM

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